Psychology and Life Quotes From Carl Rogers

50 Carl Rogers Quotes About Psychology and Behavior

Psychology and Life Quotes From Carl Rogers

Carl Rogers, born in 1902, is an American psychologist who helped establish a humanistic approach to psychology.

Carl Rogers’ theory (1959) aligns closely with Maslow’s, in the sense that he “believed that humans have one basic motive, that is the tendency to self-actualize – i.e.

, to fulfill one’s potential and achieve the highest level of ‘human beingness’ we can.” These Carl Rogers quotes speak to his knowledge of life, people, and behavior.

Part of his theory stated that “for a person to “grow”, they need an environment that provides them with genuineness (openness and self-disclosure), acceptance (being seen with unconditional positive regard), and empathy (being listened to and understood).”

He also believed that people are inherently good and that they could achieve what he referred to as becoming a “fully functioning person.” He identified five characteristics that people needed to achieve in order to reach that goal. Keep reading to discover just how close you are to being a fully functioning person!

Don’t forget to also check out these Abraham Maslow quotes on motivation and being human.

Famous Carl Rogers quotes on change, person-centered counseling, and more

1. “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” ― Carl R. Rogers

2. “A person is a fluid process, not a fixed and static entity; a flowing river of change, not a block of solid material; a continually changing constellation of potentialities, not a fixed quantity of traits.” ― Carl R. Rogers

3. “The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.” ― Carl R. Rogers

4. “If I let myself really understand another person, I might be changed by that understanding. And we all fear change. So, as I say, it is not an easy thing to permit oneself to understand an individual.” ― Carl R. Rogers

5. “We cannot change, we cannot move away from what we are until we thoroughly accept what we are. Then change seems to come about almost unnoticed.” ― Carl R. Rogers

6. “Change threatens, and its possibility creates frightened, angry people. They are found in their purest essence on the extreme right, but in all of us, there is some fear of process, of change.” ― Carl R. Rogers

7. “He has a better understanding of himself, becomes more open to his experience, denies or represses less of his experience. He becomes more accepting in his attitudes toward others, seeing others as more similar to himself.” ― Carl R. Rogers

8. “In his behavior, he shows similar changes. He is less frustrated by stress and recovers from stress more quickly. He becomes more mature in his everyday behavior, as this is observed by friends.” ― Carl R. Rogers

Carl Rogers quotes on behavior and experience

9. “I have come to feel that the only learning which significantly influences behavior is self-discovered, self-appropriated learning.” ― Carl R. Rogers

10. “Behavior is basically the goal-directed attempt of the organism to satisfy its needs, as experienced in the field as perceived.” ― Carl R. Rogers

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11. “It seems to me that anything that can be taught to another is relatively inconsequential and has little or no significant influence on behavior.” ― Carl R. Rogers

12. “The concept of “cure” is entirely inappropriate, since in most of these disorders we are dealing with learned behavior, not with a disease.” ― Carl R. Rogers

13. “Once an experience is fully in awareness, fully accepted, then it can be coped with effectively, any other clear reality.” ― Carl R. Rogers

14. “Another way of learning for me is to state my own uncertainties, to try to clarify my puzzlements, and thus get closer to the meaning that my experience actually seems to have.” ― Carl R. Rogers

15. “To recognize that “I am the one who chooses” and “I am the one who determines the value of an experience for me” is both an invigorating and a frightening realization.” ― Carl R. Rogers

16. “To be responsibly self-directing means that one chooses—and then learns from the consequences. So clients find this a sobering but exciting kind of experience.” ― Carl R. Rogers

Carl Rogers quotes about feelings, love, and relationships

17. “I regret it when I suppress my feelings too long and they burst forth in ways that are distorted or attacking or hurtful.” ― Carl R. Rogers

18. “In therapy, the individual learns to recognize and express his feelings as his own feelings, not as a fact about another person.” ― Carl R. Rogers

19. “In my relationships with persons, I have found that it does not help, in the long run, to act as though I were something that I am not.” ― Carl R. Rogers

20. “The strongest force in our universe is not overriding power, but love.” ― Carl R. Rogers

21. “What I am is good enough if I would only be it openly.” ― Carl R. Rogers

22. “What is most personal, is most universal.” ― Carl R. Rogers

23. “When a person realizes he has been deeply heard, his eyes moisten. I think in some real sense he is weeping for joy. It is as though he were saying, ‘Thank God, somebody heard me. Someone knows what it’s to be me.’” ― Carl R. Rogers

24. “True empathy is always free of any evaluative or diagnostic quality. This comes across to the recipient with some surprise. ‘If I am not being judged, perhaps I am not so evil or abnormal as I have thought.’” ― Carl R. Rogers

25.

“I am centered in the group member who is speaking and am unquestionably much less interested in the details of his quarrel with his wife, or of his difficulties on the job, or his disagreement with what has just been said, than in the meaning these experiences have for him now and the feeling they arouse in him. It is to these meanings and feelings that I try to respond.” ― Carl R. Rogers

26. “When asked a question, I try to consult my own feelings. If I sense it as being real and containing no other message than the question, then I will try my best to answer it.” ― Carl R. Rogers

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Carl Rogers quotes about life, living, and learning

27. “Am I living in a way which is deeply satisfying to me, and which truly expresses me?” ― Carl R. Rogers

28. “The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction, not a destination.” ― Carl R. Rogers

29. “You can’t possibly be afraid of death, really, you can only be afraid of life.” ― Carl R. Rogers

30. “I’m not perfect… But I’m enough.” ― Carl R. Rogers

31. “I have learned that my total organismic sensing of a situation is more trustworthy than my intellect.” ― Carl R. Rogers

32. “It is so obvious when a person is not hiding behind a facade but is speaking from deep within himself.” ― Carl R. Rogers

33. “Evaluation by others is not a guide for me. The judgments of others, while they are to be listened to, and taken into account for what they are, can never be a guide for me. This has been a hard thing to learn.” ― Carl R. Rogers

34. “I to think of myself as a quiet revolutionary.” ― Carl R. Rogers

35. “One skeptical college administrator said that the main things he had learned was that he could withdraw from personal participation, be comfortable about it, and realize that he would not be coerced. To me, this seemed valuable learning and one that would make it much more possible for him actually to participate at the next opportunity.” ― Carl R. Rogers

36. “If awareness and conscious thought are seen as a part of life – not its master nor its opponent but an illumination of the developing process within the individual – then our total life can be the unified and unifying experience that is characteristic in nature.” ― Carl R. Rogers

37. “When I try to teach, as I do sometimes, I am appalled by the results, which seem a little more than inconsequential, because sometimes the teaching appears to succeed.” ― Carl R. Rogers

Carl Rogers quotes about people and the person-centered approach

38. “People are just as wonderful as sunsets if you let them be. When I look at a sunset, I don’t find myself saying, ‘Soften the orange a bit on the right-hand corner.’ I don’t try to control a sunset. I watch with awe as it unfolds.” ― Carl R. Rogers

39. “To be what one is is to enter fully into being a process.” ― Carl R. Rogers

40. “Can I “accept” a person’s anger at me as an authentic aspect of himself? Can I “accept” the person if his beliefs and values are different from mine?” ― Carl R. Rogers

41. “I believe that individuals nowadays are probably more aware of their inner loneliness than has ever been true before in history.” ― Carl R. Rogers

42. “I believe that even our most abstract and philosophical views spring from an intensely personal base.” ― Carl R. Rogers

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43. “The intolerant “true believer” is a menace to any field, yet I suspect each one of us finds traces of that person in ourself.” ― Carl R. Rogers

44. “It becomes easier for me to accept myself as a decidedly imperfect person, who by no means functions at all times in the way in which I would to function.” ― Carl R. Rogers

45. “The only way to understand another culture is to assume the frame of reference of that culture.” ― Carl R. Rogers

46. “There is no doubt that I am selective in my listening, hence “directive” if people wish to accuse me of this.” ― Carl R. Rogers

47. “If a person wishes to remain psychologically on the sidelines, he has my implicit permission to do so.” ― Carl R. Rogers

48. “It is this knowledge of the past that gives me courage to propose methods for dealing with intercultural, interracial, and international tensions.

I believe that if the public becomes truly aware that present-day policies are targeted directly toward the destruction of all of us, then they may decide to look for alternatives.

And the person-centered approach offers just such an alternative.” ― Carl R. Rogers

49. “He changes his perception of himself, becoming more realistic in his views of self. He becomes more the person he wishes to be. He values himself more highly. He is more self-confident and self-directing.” ― Carl R. Rogers

50. “A second characteristic of the persons who emerge from therapy is difficult to describe. It seems that the person increasingly discovers that his own organism is trustworthy, that it is a suitable instrument for discovering the most satisfying behavior in each immediate situation.” ― Carl R. Rogers

What did you learn from these Carl Rogers quotes?

Carl Rogers believed that the first characteristic of a fully functioning person depended on their willingness to be open to experiences. This meant accepting that positive and negative emotions had to be acknowledged.

Living in the moment, or existential living is the second characteristic of a fully functioning person. Dwelling on the past or planning too far into the future takes away from what you are experiencing right now.

The third characteristic he describes is the degree to which a person trusts their feelings and decisions. Next, he felt that fully functioning people are able to be creative and take risks. Lastly, living a fulfilled life, one where you are happy and satisfied, yet still seeking challenges would mean you were fully functioning.

Rogers believed that we could all get there, but much Maslow’s concept of self-actualization felt that most people would not reach this level. What do you think? I know there are days where I definitely do not feel a fully functioning adult!

What’s your biggest takeaway from these Carl Rogers quotes and sayings? Do you have any other favorite quotes to add? Let us know in the comment section below.

April 23, 2021 7:00 AM EST

Источник: https://everydaypower.com/carl-rogers-quotes/

Carl Rogers Theory

Psychology and Life Quotes From Carl Rogers

By Dr. Saul McLeod, updated 2014

Carl Rogers (1902-1987) was a humanistic psychologist who agreed with the main assumptions of Abraham Maslow. However, Rogers (1959) added that for a person to «grow», they need an environment that provides them with genuineness (openness and self-disclosure), acceptance (being seen with unconditional positive regard), and empathy (being listened to and understood).

Without these, relationships and healthy personalities will not develop as they should, much a tree will not grow without sunlight and water.

Rogers believed that every person could achieve their goals, wishes, and desires in life. When, or rather if they did so, self actualization took place.

This was one of Carl Rogers most important contributions to psychology, and for a person to reach their potential a number of factors must be satisfied.

Self Actualization

«The organism has one basic tendency and striving — to actualize, maintain, and enhance the experiencing organism”(Rogers, 1951, p. 487).

Rogers rejected the deterministic nature of both psychoanalysis and behaviorism and maintained that we behave as we do because of the way we perceive our situation. «As no one else can know how we perceive, we are the best experts on ourselves.»

Carl Rogers (1959) believed that humans have one basic motive, that is the tendency to self-actualize — i.e., to fulfill one's potential and achieve the highest level of 'human-beingness' we can.

a flower that will grow to its full potential if the conditions are right, but which is constrained by its environment, so people will flourish and reach their potential if their environment is good enough.

However, un a flower, the potential of the individual human is unique, and we are meant to develop in different ways according to our personality.  Rogers believed that people are inherently good and creative.

They become destructive only when a poor self-concept or external constraints override the valuing process.  Carl Rogers believed that for a person to achieve self-actualization they must be in a state of congruence.

This means that self-actualization occurs when a person’s “ideal self” (i.e., who they would to be) is congruent with their actual behavior (self-image).

Rogers describes an individual who is actualizing as a fully functioning person. The main determinant of whether we will become self-actualized is childhood experience.

The Fully Functioning Person

Rogers believed that every person could achieve their goal. This means that the person is in touch with the here and now, his or her subjective experiences and feelings, continually growing and changing.

In many ways, Rogers regarded the fully functioning person as an ideal and one that people do not ultimately achieve. It is wrong to think of this as an end or completion of life’s journey; rather it is a process of always becoming and changing.

Rogers identified five characteristics of the fully functioning person:

1. Open to experience: both positive and negative emotions accepted. Negative feelings are not denied, but worked through (rather than resorting to ego defense mechanisms).

2. Existential living: in touch with different experiences as they occur in life, avoiding prejudging and preconceptions. Being able to live and fully appreciate the present, not always looking back to the past or forward to the future (i.e., living for the moment).

3. Trust feelings: feeling, instincts, and gut-reactions are paid attention to and trusted. People’s own decisions are the right ones, and we should trust ourselves to make the right choices.

4. Creativity: creative thinking and risk-taking are features of a person’s life. A person does not play safe all the time. This involves the ability to adjust and change and seek new experiences.

5. Fulfilled life: a person is happy and satisfied with life, and always looking for new challenges and experiences.

For Rogers, fully functioning people are well adjusted, well balanced and interesting to know. Often such people are high achievers in society.

Critics claim that the fully functioning person is a product of Western culture. In other cultures, such as Eastern cultures, the achievement of the group is valued more highly than the achievement of any one person.

Personality Development

Central to Rogers' personality theory is the notion of self or self-concept.  This is defined as «the organized, consistent set of perceptions and beliefs about oneself.»

The self is the humanistic term for who we really are as a person.  The self is our inner personality, and can be ned to the soul, or Freud's psyche.  The self is influenced by the experiences a person has in their life, and out interpretations of those experiences.  Two primary sources that influence our self-concept are childhood experiences and evaluation by others.

According to Rogers (1959), we want to feel, experience and behave in ways which are consistent with our self-image and which reflect what we would to be , our ideal-self.  The closer our self-image and ideal-self are to each other, the more consistent or congruent we are and the higher our sense of self-worth. 

A person is said to be in a state of incongruence if some of the totality of their experience is unacceptable to them and is denied or distorted in the self-image.

The humanistic approach states that the self is composed of concepts unique to ourselves. The self-concept includes three components:

Self-worth

Self-worth (or self-esteem) comprises what we think about ourselves. Rogers believed feelings of self-worth developed in early childhood and were formed from the interaction of the child with the mother and father.

Self-image

How we see ourselves, which is important to good psychological health. Self-image includes the influence of our body image on inner personality.

At a simple level, we might perceive ourselves as a good or bad person, beautiful or ugly. Self-image affects how a person thinks, feels and behaves in the world.

Ideal-self

This is the person who we would to be. It consists of our goals and ambitions in life, and is dynamic – i.e., forever changing.

The ideal self in childhood is not the ideal self in our teens or late twenties etc.

Positive Regard and Self Worth

Carl Rogers (1951) viewed the child as having two basic needs: positive regard from other people and self-worth.

How we think about ourselves, our feelings of self-worth are of fundamental importance both to psychological health and to the lihood that we can achieve goals and ambitions in life and achieve self-actualization.

Self-worth may be seen as a continuum from very high to very low.  For Carl Rogers (1959) a person who has high self-worth, that is, has confidence and positive feelings about him or herself, faces challenges in life, accepts failure and unhappiness at times, and is open with people.

A person with low self-worth may avoid challenges in life, not accept that life can be painful and unhappy at times, and will be defensive and guarded with other people.

Rogers believed feelings of self-worth developed in early childhood and were formed from the interaction of the child with the mother and father. As a child grows older, interactions with significant others will affect feelings of self-worth.

Rogers believed that we need to be regarded positively by others; we need to feel valued, respected, treated with affection and loved. Positive regard is to do with how other people evaluate and judge us in social interaction. Rogers made a distinction between unconditional positive regard and conditional positive regard.

Unconditional Positive Regard

Unconditional positive regard is where parents, significant others (and the humanist therapist) accepts and loves the person for what he or she is.  Positive regard is not withdrawn if the person does something wrong or makes a mistake. 

The consequences of unconditional positive regard are that the person feels free to try things out and make mistakes, even though this may lead to getting it worse at times.

People who are able to self-actualize are more ly to have received unconditional positive regard from others, especially their parents in childhood.

Conditional Positive Regard

Conditional positive regard is where positive regard, praise, and approval, depend upon the child, for example, behaving in ways that the parents think correct.

Hence the child is not loved for the person he or she is, but on condition that he or she behaves only in ways approved by the parent(s). 

At the extreme, a person who constantly seeks approval from other people is ly only to have experienced conditional positive regard as a child.

Congruence

A person’s ideal self may not be consistent with what actually happens in life and experiences of the person. Hence, a difference may exist between a person’s ideal self and actual experience. This is called incongruence.

Where a person’s ideal self and actual experience are consistent or very similar, a state of congruence exists. Rarely, if ever, does a total state of congruence exist; all people experience a certain amount of incongruence.

The development of congruence is dependent on unconditional positive regard. Carl Rogers believed that for a person to achieve self-actualization they must be in a state of congruence.

According to Rogers, we want to feel, experience and behave in ways which are consistent with our self-image and which reflect what we would to be , our ideal-self.

The closer our self-image and ideal-self are to each other, the more consistent or congruent we are and the higher our sense of self-worth. A person is said to be in a state of incongruence if some of the totality of their experience is unacceptable to them and is denied or distorted in the self-image.

Incongruence is «a discrepancy between the actual experience of the organism and the self-picture of the individual insofar as it represents that experience.

As we prefer to see ourselves in ways that are consistent with our self-image, we may use defense mechanisms denial or repression in order to feel less threatened by some of what we consider to be our undesirable feelings.

A person whose self-concept is incongruent with her or his real feelings and experiences will defend because the truth hurts.

Carl Rogers Quotes

«The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to judge it».(Rogers, 1961, p. 351)

«I have gradually come to one negative conclusion about the good life. It seems to me that the good life is not any fixed state. It is not, in my estimation, a state of virtue, or contentment, or nirvana, or happiness.

It is not a condition in which the individual is adjusted or fulfilled or actualized. To use psychological terms, it is not a state of drive-reduction, or tension-reduction, or homeostasis».(Rogers, 1967, p.

185-186)

«The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination».(Rogers, 1967, p. 187)

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How to reference this article:

McLeod, S. A. (2014, Febuary 05). Carl Rogers. Simply Psychology. www.simplypsychology.org/carl-rogers.html

APA Style References

Rogers, C. (1951). Client-centered therapy: Its current practice, implications and theory. London: Constable.

Rogers, C. (1959). A theory of therapy, personality and interpersonal relationships as developed in the client-centered framework. In (ed.) S. Koch, Psychology: A study of a science. Vol. 3: Formulations of the person and the social context. New York: McGraw Hill.

Rogers, C. R. (1961). On Becoming a person: A psychotherapists view of psychotherapy. Houghton Mifflin.

Rogers, C. R., Stevens, B., Gendlin, E. T., Shlien, J. M., & Van Dusen, W. (1967). Person to person: The problem of being human: A new trend in psychology. Lafayette, CA: Real People Press.

 Download this article as a PDF

7 of the Best Quotes from Psychologist Carl Rogers: Empathy, Tolerance, and More

Psychology and Life Quotes From Carl Rogers

Carl Rogers often spoke of the control we have over destiny, about experience and personal growth, as well as the value of people and relationships.

Since the 1950’s, Carl Rogers has been an eminent figure in the field of humanistic psychology. His best-known publications are Client-Centered Therapy (1951), and Becoming a Person (1961).

Together with Abraham Maslow, Rogers was a psychologist who gave great importance to personal development. Many of Rogers’s quotes focus on helping people reflect on their own life. That’s why we’ve compiled some of his best quotes here for you.

“Being empathetic is seeing the world through the eyes of the other, not seeing your world reflected in their eyes.”

From Carl Rogers’s perspective, empathy is a fundamental concept. In fact, he considered it one of the basic attitudes that a person has to develop to reach self-realization.

Now, being empathetic, according to Carl Rogers, is not putting yourself in the other’s shoes. Empathy takes serious work, reflection and knowledge about how the other person observes and experiences the world around them.

Empathy is not only what you would do in the other’s situation, but also how you would react in that situation their worldview.

Direct experience as a priority

“Neither the bible, nor the prophets, nor the revelations of God or of men… Nothing has priority over direct experience.”

This quote is controversial, but it also makes you think. Rogers emphasizes that our most important guide isn’t others, not even religion. The most important guide is within yourself.

Rogers says the highest authority is one’s own experience. While he thinks other people’s judgement should be heard, he says they shouldn’t be considered a guide.

Thus, any human being should be treated as an individual worthy of respect, with the right to evaluate their experience in their own way, and with the power of autonomous choice.

Acceptance as an impulse for change

“The curious paradox is that, when I accept myself as I am, then I can change.”

For Rogers, acceptance is the basis of change. If there’s no acceptance, there’s no change because the mind is “lost.” Therefore looking at who we really are and knowing ourselves is the key to growing as a person.

The value of being yourself

“I feel happier just for being myself and letting others be themselves.”

Carl Rogers thinks people are as beautiful as sunsets — if they’re allowed to be sunsets. That is, he appreciates sincerity and authenticity above all; the natural state of each one of us.

Rogers learned in his relationships that, in the long-term, it doesn’t help to act someone he’s not. We can’t be happy if we display a false version of ourselves because we are, effectively, rejecting ourselves.

Admitting our feelings

“It’s not about getting the feeling the mind, or hiding it, but about experiencing it with acceptance.”

When we experience any feeling, the appropriate action is to accept it, not evade or repress it. The feeling must be sheltered and listened to.

What is the message it entails? Only then will we be able to know ourselves and others. Only then will we begin to get to know each other.

Tolerating uncertainty

“I realize that, if I were stable, prudent, and static, I would live in death. Therefore, I accept confusion, uncertainty, fear, and emotional ups and downs. Because that is the price I am willing to pay for a fluid, perplexing, and exciting life.”

Fear and uncertainty are our companions in life. Not everything is controllable or predictable, or even safe. Confusion and emotional ups and downs will happen and we have to be prepared.

Having the idea that we can control everything comes from being afraid of not knowing how to react. It is the result of insecurity. And, even though it’s impossible to be prepared for everything, sometimes we act we can and get imprisoned in mental rigidity.

If we want to live in fluidity, we have to learn to let go. This will open the way to flexibility and enjoyment.

Learn to learn

“The man who is educated is the one who learns to learn.”

Carl Rogers understood that, as an educated person, he was trying to grow and change. Self-knowledge and self-realization walk hand-in-hand along the path of life. To be educated, one must be informed, reflect, and question.

As we can see, the legacy Carl Rogers left is a great source of knowledge and can really help people. In his first years as a professional, he always asked himself the same question: how can I treat, cure, or change this person?

But his experience eventually changed this question to: how can I provide a relationship that this person can use for their own personal growth?

His numerous contributions to psychotherapy and his innovative vision of therapeutic practice are still alive today. He developed many theories but, without a doubt, reflecting on these quotes will help us understand his way of thinking. They’ll make us think.

It might interest you…

Источник: https://exploringyourmind.com/the-7-best-phrases-from-carl-rogers/

34 Carl Rogers Quotes For All Budding Psychologists

Psychology and Life Quotes From Carl Rogers

Carl R. Rogers was an American psychologist who is well-known for studying the humanistic approach in terms of psychology.

“An intelligent person can rationalize anything, a wise person doesn’t try,” as Jen Knox said, it takes patience and ability to understand the world of psychology. Carl Rogers was indeed a great contributor to psychology therapy and theories that gave a whole new insight to the budding psychologists.

He studied and was one of the founders of humanistic psychology and introduced many therapies around it. Here are the best Carl Rogers quotes to get a better approach towards psychotherapy. If you these Carl Rogers quotes, do not forget to check out our selection of Erich Fromm quotes and Sigmund Freud quotes.
 

Best Carl Rogers Quotes On Empathy

All Carl Rogers quotes encourage one to go for self-introspection and learn the skills to control the state of mind. Here are the best Carl Rogers quotes to help you get better insights into the world of psychology.

1. “Over the years, however, the research evidence keeps piling up, and it points strongly to the conclusion that a high degree of empathy in a relationship is possibly the most potent and certainly one of the most potent factors in bringing about change and learning.”

— Carl Rogers.

2. “Empathy is the listener's effort to hear the other person deeply, accurately, and non-judgmentally. Empathy involves skillful reflective listening that clarifies and amplifies the person’s own experiencing and meaning, without imposing the listener’s own material.”

— Carl Rogers.

3. “We think we listen, but very rarely do we listen with real understanding, true empathy. Yet listening, of this very special kind, is one of the most potent forces for change that I know.”

— Carl Rogers.

4. “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.”

— Carl Rogers.

5. “People are just as wonderful as sunsets if you let them be. When I look at a sunset, I don't find myself saying,  ‘Soften the orange a bit on the right-hand corner.’ I don't try to control a sunset. I watch with awe as it unfolds.”

— Carl Rogers.

6. “The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.”

— Carl Rogers.

7. “As no one else can know how we perceive, we are the best experts on ourselves.”

— Carl Rogers.

8. “When the other person is hurting, confused, troubled, anxious, alienated, terrified; or when he or she is doubtful of self-worth, uncertain as to identity, then understanding is called for. The gentle and sensitive companionship of an empathic stance… provides illumination and healing. In such situations, deep understanding is, I believe, the most precious gift one can give to another.”

— Carl Rogers.

9. “When someone really hears you without passing judgment on you, without trying to take responsibility for you, without trying to mold you, it feels damn good. . . . When I have been listened to and when I have been heard, I am able to re-perceive my world in a new way and to go on.”

— Carl Rogers.

10. “Empathy is a special way of coming to know another and ourselves, a kind of attuning and understanding. When empathy is extended, it satisfies our needs and wishes for intimacy, it rescues us from our feelings of aloneness.”

— Carl Rogers.

11. “Powerful is our need to be known, really known by ourselves and others, even if only for a moment.”

— Carl Rogers.

Amazing Carl Rogers Quotes

Carl Rogers is known for the client-centered approach of his work. Check out some of the most amazing quotes by Carl Rogers in order to help you in becoming a person who is compassionate. There are also some of the best Carl Rogers quotes from 'On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy'.

12. “Am I living in a way which is deeply satisfying to me, and which truly expresses me?”

— Carl Rogers.

13. “I realize that if I were stable and steady and static, I would be living death. So I accept confusion and uncertainty and fear and emotional highs and lows because they are the price I willingly pay for a flowing, perplexing, exciting life.”

— Carl Rogers.

14. “It is astonishing how elements that seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens, how confusions that seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard.”

— Carl Rogers.

15. “The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction, not a destination.”

— Carl Rogers.

16. “It is the client who knows what hurts, what directions to go, what problems are crucial, what experiences have been deeply buried. It began to occur to me that unless I had a need to demonstrate my own cleverness and learning, I would do better to rely upon the client for the direction of movement in the process.”

— Carl Rogers.

17. “It’s not about getting the feeling the mind, or hiding it, but about experiencing it with acceptance.”

— Carl Rogers.

18. “Being empathetic is seeing the world through the eyes of the other, not seeing your world reflected in their eyes.”

— Carl Rogers.

19. “What I am is good enough if I would only be it openly.”

— Carl Rogers.

20. “Experience is, for me, the highest authority. The touchstone of validity is my own experience. No other person's ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. It is to experience that I must return again and again, to discover a closer approximation to truth as it is in the process of becoming me.”

— Carl Rogers.

21. “One of the most satisfying experiences I know is fully to appreciate an individual in the same way I appreciate a sunset.”

— Carl Rogers.

22. “In my early professionals years, I was asking the question: How can I treat, or cure, or change this person? Now I would phrase the question in this way: How can I provide a relationship which this person may use for his own personal growth?»

— Carl Rogers.

23. “A person is a fluid process, not a fixed and static entity; a flowing river of change, not a block of solid material; a continually changing constellation of potentialities, not a fixed quantity of traits.”

— Carl Rogers.

Wise Carl Rogers Quotes

Here are some of the wisest Carl Rogers quotes including a few from his most popular work 'On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy' to help you take the wise steps in your life.

24. “The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to judge it.”

— Carl Rogers.

25. “It is not that this focus of power to the person, it is that it never takes it away.”

— Carl Rogers.

26. “Life, at its best, is a fluid and changing process in which nothing is fixed.”

— Carl Rogers.

27. “I have gradually come to one negative conclusion about the good life. It seems to me that the good life is not any fixed state.”

— Carl Rogers.

28. “What is most personal is most universal.”

— Carl Rogers.

29. “There is direction but there is no destination.”

— Carl Rogers.

30. “The degree to which I can create relationships, which facilitate the growth of others as separate persons, is a measure of the growth I have achieved in myself.”

— Carl Rogers.

31. “With the price of life these days, you've got to get everything for free you can.”

— Carl Rogers.

32. “The facts are always friendly, every bit of evidence one can acquire, in any area, leads one that much closer to what is true.”

— Carl Rogers.

33. “When I look at the world I'm pessimistic, but when I look at people I am optimistic.”

— Carl Rogers.

34. “A person’s real need, a most terrible need, is for someone to listen…not as a ‘patient’ but as a human soul. To listen well is to respond to a great human yearning.”

— Carl Rogers.

Here at Kidadl, we have carefully created lots of interesting family-friendly quotes for everyone to enjoy! If you d our suggestions for Carl Rogers quotes, then why not take a look at William James quotes, or Erik Erikson quotes.

Источник: https://kidadl.com/articles/carl-rogers-quotes-for-all-budding-psychologists

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