How to Seek Support When Experiencing White Supremacist Harm

Содержание
  1. To end white supremacy, attack racist policy, not people
  2. Berkeley News: What does the country have to do, moving forward to defeat white supremacy?
  3. Recent polls find that white Americans have been the least engaged in trying to understand racial injustice issues in this country. How do you reach people who aren’t interested in supporting movements Black Lives Matter and may even take offense at what these groups are protesting?
  4. Whose job is it to explain these nuances to people who don’t agree or understand them?
  5. How do we still hold white supremacist institutions and structures accountable without making white people feel excluded?
  6. When you have political leaders feeding misinformation to the public that causes more divisions, and gives people a sense of recognition by spreading falsehoods — for example, all these people think the election was fraudulent because former president Trump said it was — how can we unite as a country?
  7. What can individuals do on a local level to help fight white supremacy?
  8. Resources to Fight White Nationalist Groups During the Election Period and Beyond — The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights
  9. Support the first United States Commission on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation
  10. Demand that Congress Ensure that White Nationalist Insurrectionists are Held Accountable Now and Oppose the Creation of a New Charge that Would Target Our Communities
  11. Help Prevent and Improve the Response to Hate Crimes
  12. Tell Social Media Companies to Stop Profiting Off of Hate
  13. Hold Leaders Accountable for their Words and their Actions
  14. Black Justice is Our Justice – Join People from Across Different Communities in Celebrating Solidarity and Power in the Fight Against Anti-Blackness
  15. Learn More About White Nationalist Groups: Information about White Nationalist Groups Whose Actions are Not Protected by the Constitution and About State Laws to Combat Them – Share with Local Government and Law Enforcement Leaders
  16. Origins of Neo-Nazi and White Supremacist Terms and Symbols: A Glossary
  17. Nazi Flags and Crosses
  18. Nazi Racial Ideology
  19. “Blood and Soil”
  20. “Alien,” “Parasite,” “Degenerate”
  21. Ethnic Cleansing
  22. ‘Heil’ and the Nazi Salute
  23. “Jewish Communists”
  24. Nazi Colors (black, white, and red)
  25. Swastika
  26. Torches and Fire
  27. “Vermin,” “Disease”
  28. Additional Resources
  29. U.S. Businesses Must Take Meaningful Action Against Racism
  30. Avoiding Missteps
  31. Taking Meaningful Action

To end white supremacy, attack racist policy, not people

How to Seek Support When Experiencing White Supremacist Harm

UC Berkeley professor john powell says the country needs to combat white supremacy through collective action. This photo is from the Overpass Light Brigade of San Diego and Solidarity Brigade who mobilized to create light projections in solidarity with racial justice and immigrant rights. (Photo courtesy of flikr/Backbone Campaign)

In his inaugural address last week, President Joe Biden made it clear his administration will make defeating white supremacy — as well as the rise of political extremism and domestic terrorism — a priority for his presidency. But in order to do that, Americans must focus on defeating white supremacist structures without condemning white people.

john powell is the Director of the Othering & Belonging Institute at UC Berkeley, a research institute that brings together scholars and policymakers to identify ways to create more equity. (UC Berkeley photo)

That’s according to Berkeley African American studies professor john powell, who said,  “We need a story that says, ‘No, this is a country for all of us.”

“When we reach out, as we should, and animate the voice of marginalized people of color, we also need to make sure we are holding a space for people who have organized around whiteness, not for whiteness itself, but for those people,” said powell, who is also the director of Berkeley’s Othering and Belonging Institute. “And that’s hard, because it means criticizing and sometimes condemning the practice of white supremacy, but at the same time holding on to the people that practice it.”

Berkeley News spoke with powell about what political leaders and everyday American citizens can do to help in the efforts to battle white supremacy, and the importance of making sure everyone is recognized in the process.

[This interview was edited for brevity and clarity]

Berkeley News: What does the country have to do, moving forward to defeat white supremacy?

john powell: I thought Biden’s speech on Inauguration Day was quite good, because he named it and called it white supremacy and not just racism. People are affected by their leaders and what they say.

White supremacy is an identity and a belief in the superiority of Western civilization that is sometimes a corollary, or independent, of the supremacy of white people to dominate and control.

I would start with what I call “short bridges” with people who are closer to us that we may have deep divisions with. It’s also important to, in a sense, attack white supremacy, but not attack white people. I think oftentimes those two things get conflated.

It’s more about the structural and institutional racist systems. In those systems, those ideas are actually animated and reproduced without the necessity of there being a racist person.

The people who embrace that system and ideology can be of any race.

Berkeley News is examining racial justice in America in a new series of stories.

We also have to create a better narrative where everyone, every group, can thrive and matter. We have to create policies and practices so we’re not pitting groups against each other. We have to care about all parts of the country — the city, suburbs and rural America, as well.

We can follow it up with policy that invests more in local communities. To say, “We’re going to invest in your schools, we’re going invest in you because you’re a part of this country.

” But it doesn’t mean we’re not going to invest in Latinx communities. It doesn’t mean we’re not going to invest in Black communities. It doesn’t mean we’re not going to invest in Asian American communities.

It means we’re going to invest in everybody.

But different groups will get different investments, because some groups are much further behind. How are we going to pay for that? Everybody has to pay their fair share.

There’s also an ontological threat that a lot of people are experiencing. It’s not just tied to an economic threat — Trump supporters are not just low-income and work people, they’re also middle-class professionals. It’s the fear that, as the country becomes more racially, economically, religiously and linguistically diverse, that, “I’m going to be replaced.” And that anxiety is normal.

We need a story that says, “No, this is a country for all of us.” And so, when we reach out, as we should, and animate the voice of marginalized people of color, we also need to make sure we are holding a space for people who have organized around whiteness — not for whiteness itself, but for those people.

And that’s hard, because it means criticizing and sometimes condemning the practice of white supremacy, but at the same time holding on to the people that practice it.

Recent polls find that white Americans have been the least engaged in trying to understand racial injustice issues in this country. How do you reach people who aren’t interested in supporting movements Black Lives Matter and may even take offense at what these groups are protesting?

A Black Lives Matter rally at the Alameda County Courthouse in Oakland. (Photo by Annette Bernhardt, director of the Low-Wage Work Program at UC Berkeley’s Labor Center.)

Rapid change creates anxiety.

It’s a parent and a child.

When a child falls down a couple of times before they cry, they look to their mother and father and say, “What does this mean? Should I be concerned about this?” And if the parents freak out, the kid freaks out.

If the parents say, “Oh, you got a little blood on you, but get up, and you’ll be fine,” then they’ll be OK. In a sense, all of us are that: We need to find that meaning in the change.

The country has a history of being afraid of Black people, and if you don’t know any Black people, if you live in suburban communities, I can see why you are afraid of Black people. You think of the police as doing this dangerous job. Whereas, if you are Black, when you think of the police you think they bring danger.

We live segregated lives and we live in different stories. And the question is: Who can hold those stories? We all can.

Lifting up Black people, lifting up Native people, lifting up Latinos and Asians, doesn’t mean we’re putting down white people. It does mean that there’s a history of this country being organized around white supremacy.

We’ve got to come to terms with that.

Whose job is it to explain these nuances to people who don’t agree or understand them?

In this effort, I don’t believe anyone should be on the sidelines. This is not just a struggle for Black people, but I think Black people have a particular role to play.

Some people of color might say, “That’s not my job” and “Why should I show concern for white people?” I would say, “It’s not your job, but it is the job of the country, and we’re trying to create a world where everybody belongs.”

So, we’ve got to get better at that. We have to really think about creating a society where we have the capacity to lift up injustices, to lift up problems, but also to do it in a way that we actually hold onto the humanity of everyone.

How do we still hold white supremacist institutions and structures accountable without making white people feel excluded?

There’s a South African term “Sawubona,” which means: I see you. I value you. You are important to me.

Everybody needs to be recognized. And the reality is there are a lot of white people who don’t have much power. Yet, they may still organize around white supremacy.

I spoke in rural Alabama about the Affordable Care Act to an all-white community that I believe supported Trump. And I was there to talk to them about changing the laws in Alabama so that they could extend the Affordable Care Act to Alabama. Most of them were against it, and they saw this act as something for Black and Latinx people, not for them.

Instead of talking about why this is needed in those communities, I asked them about their own lives: Had any of them been turned away from insurance because they lost a job? Did any of them have their children not covered because of preexisting conditions? Did any of them have a doctor order a prescription, but the insurance company said no?

I had them stand up each time I asked a question that applied to them. They had around 600 people there, and after three or four questions — everybody was standing up.

People got really animated, and they were yelling and said, “F— insurance companies,” and I said, “These are the problems that the Affordable Care Act is trying to solve.”

They really thought it was socialism, and they didn’t even know what it was. How did they come to that decision? They didn’t read the act, they had some leaders tell them that this was socialism or communism without even knowing what socialism or communism really was either.

I then explained to them each and every one of the problems we identified is worst in the Black and Latinx community. I didn’t lose one person in the conversation after that — but I had to make space for them to be part of the story.

When you have political leaders feeding misinformation to the public that causes more divisions, and gives people a sense of recognition by spreading falsehoods — for example, all these people think the election was fraudulent because former president Trump said it was — how can we unite as a country?

President Donald Trump addresses militant protesters before they marched to the U.S. Capitol where they sieged the building amidst unverified claims of election fraud. (Video image via Channel 9 News Australia)

Moving forward, this is a huge problem, but we can address it. I talk a lot about bridging between our divisions, and you don’t bridge with the most difficult person or group, you start with short bridges.

And as we get better at talking about our differences, we’ll learn. You can’t make someone come along, but you can create a space where they can come along where we can be hard and critical on structures, but soft on people.

If someone says they’re against immigration, I’m happy to talk about their pain. “How did you get there? Talk to me about your truth,” instead of saying, “You’re stupid for believing that.” If I come to you and say, “I don’t see you, you’re invisible,” and say you’re stupid — that pushes you further away.

We know how to do this at a certain level. It’s hard to take this to a national level without help from leaders and help from structures themselves. It’s not impossible, but it’s harder to hate up close. When we connect with each other and create the conditions to support people coming together with a shared humanity, more often than not it works.

When people’s stories are recognized, it does something: It creates a possibility.

What can individuals do on a local level to help fight white supremacy?

I would say start where you are.

It’s a hard task, because all the structures move us in one direction, so it’s we’re swimming against the current, and it can get exhausting. But as soon as we relax, we start going downstream again. So, we have to eventually change the current. But in the meantime, there are things we can begin to do.

I have a neighbor across the street living in a fancy house who was saying, “OK, I see how we accumulate wealth. How can I sell my house to a person of color?” Well, now the legal constraints always make these things hard, but the fact he’s asking, and the fact that he’s interrogating the passing of wealth and privilege on to his next generation to me is a big step.

I would also to see some more deliberate efforts, creating spaces for people to connect. I was actually talking to a number of restaurant owners about having tables where they’d give a five percent discount to sit at a table with a stranger. They’re doing that already in Israel and other communities.

Our connectedness is fragile, but so is our hatred.

Источник: https://news.berkeley.edu/2021/01/25/to-end-white-supremacy-attack-racist-policy-not-people/

Resources to Fight White Nationalist Groups During the Election Period and Beyond — The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

How to Seek Support When Experiencing White Supremacist Harm

Since the founding of our country, African people, their descendants, and other marginalized groups have borne the brunt of structural inequity, racism, and discrimination.

Policies American chattel slavery, Black Codes, convict leasing, Jim Crow segregation, along with redlining and racial discrimination in education, employment, and access to public services,  have all contributed to a generational harm to African Americans that continues today and  can no longer be ignored. It is past time for the nation to begin to unearth the true severity of such trauma and begin the process of healing.

Descendants of African slaves, particularly in America, are owed reparations because the United States derived great financial benefit from the government-sanctioned institution of slavery.

The subjugation of African Americans was integral to establishing the United States as a world economic power. After the official end of slavery, African Americans were continuously denied the right to participate in the economic growth of this country.

During Jim Crow, African American entrepreneurial ability was limited by intimidation, lynching, massacres, and the decimation of entire communities.

In January of this year, Representative Sheila Jackson-Lee re-introduced H.R. 40, which would provide a mechanism through which the U.S.

government can finally atone for America’s original sin—the brutal treatment of African slaves and their descendants—which in turn has led to structural racism and discrimination in this country. Importantly, H.

R 40 will require the federal government to undertake an official study to analyze the impact of slavery on the social, political and economic life of our nation.

Read the legislation here, learn more about reparations and let your member of Congress know that you support this critical piece of legislation.  

Support the first United States Commission on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation

If we are to truly address the white supremacy on display on January 6 and that consistently fuels an increase in hate incidents and hate crimes, we must confront the ways in which the racism we fight today is connected to the white supremacy that accompanied the founding of our country. 

Congresswoman Barbara Lee introduced legislation in June, 2020 calling for the establishment of the first United States Commission on Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT).

The Commission will examine the effects of slavery, institutional racism, and discrimination against people of color, and how our history impacts laws and policies today.

This proposal would create a commission with a mission “to properly acknowledge, memorialize, and be a catalyst for progress toward jettisoning the belief in a hierarchy of human value, embracing our common humanity, and permanently eliminating persistent racial inequities.”

Read the legislation here, learn more about the importance of a Commission on Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation here, and let your member of Congress know that you support this critical piece of legislation. 

Demand that Congress Ensure that White Nationalist Insurrectionists are Held Accountable Now and Oppose the Creation of a New Charge that Would Target Our Communities

We must meet the challenge of addressing white nationalist and far-right militia violence without causing further harm to communities already disproportionately impacted by the criminal-legal system.

The Justice Department (DOJ), including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (I), has over 50 terrorism-related statutes it can use to investigate and prosecute criminal conduct, including white supremacist violence, as well as dozens of other federal statutes relating to hate crimes, organized crime, conspiracy, and violent crimes.

The failure to confront and hold accountable white nationalist violence is not a question of not having appropriate tools to employ, but a failure to use those on hand. To date, DOJ has simply decided as a matter of policy and practice not to prioritize white nationalist crimes.

Congress should use its oversight and appropriations authorities to ensure that law enforcement appropriately focuses investigative and prosecutorial resources on white nationalist crimes.

Our country’s long and disturbing history of targeting Black Activists, Muslims, Arabs, and movements for social and racial justice has shown that a new domestic terrorism charge would be used to expand racial profiling or to surveil and investigate communities of color and political opponents in the name of national security.  

Learn more about why over 150 civil rights organizations support a call to hold white nationalists accountable now using existing criminal statutes and call your member of Congress to oppose the creation of a new charge that would harm the very same communities targeted by white nationalists. 

Listen here to learn what Congress Should and Should Not Do

Help Prevent and Improve the Response to Hate Crimes

White nationalist violence is not only not new, it also takes many forms, including hate crimes that may appear to target one person, but are actually targeting an entire community.  We know that hate violence is increasing, and that communities across the country are working together to fight it.

The most recent federal data available for hate crimes comes from 2019, and that year marked the deadliest year on record since the hate crimes reporting program started in 1991.

This is especially alarming considering that the number of law enforcement agencies voluntarily reporting their figures has decreased, which means the report only captures a fraction of actual incidents of hate crimes. 

These acts of hate and violence are horrific, and in targeting people of color, religious minorities, immigrants, and LGBTQ individuals, they are attempting to target entire communities. 

Help community leaders support impacted communities, encourage people targeted for hate to report hate crimes to law enforcement or to community led sites StopAAPIhate.

org, and let local government officials know that accurate reporting of  hate crimes is important to youl.

 Share resources from the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law with law enforcement leaders in your community.

Let your member of Congress know that they must re-introduce and pass the Jabera-Hayer NO HATE Act to improve hate crime prevention, reporting, and best practices in supporting targeted communities. 

Tell Social Media Companies to Stop Profiting Off of Hate

For the sake of public safety, social media companies cannot let the status quo of bigoted violence, intimidation and threats continue on their platforms. They must enforce their hate speech content policies. Tell , and to do the right thing and stop the racism that’s endemic to their platforms.

Hold Leaders Accountable for their Words and their Actions

Demand all of your elected officials, employers, and faith leaders speak out against white supremacy.  Do not use euphemisms.

Those in power must use their platforms to denounce hate each and every time. Tweet at your leaders and let them know #WhiteSupremacyKills. Demand they take a position against hate.

We have seen the consequences of the President’s words and policies, and we must demand action.

Black Justice is Our Justice – Join People from Across Different Communities in Celebrating Solidarity and Power in the Fight Against Anti-Blackness

The Leadership Conference Education Fund is proud to partner with the Black Alliance for Justice Immigration (BAJI) to launch our 501 (c)(3) campaign, Black Justice is Our Justice.

  As white nationalist groups feel emboldened during this election period, this campaign combats the fear that some use to sow division between communities of color, Black communities, religious minorities, immigrants, members of the LGBTQ community, and others with hope, love, and action.

 Our campaign highlights stories of real and meaningful solidarity and unity among diverse immigrant groups and other communities targeted for hate.  It demonstrates the harm of criminalization.  

The national campaign starts by centering both Black immigrants as well as Black people disenfranchised due to the criminal legal system.  The campaign recognizes that in this country, we must fight anti-Blackness in order to combat all forms of racism and discrimination.  Across the U.S.

, as Black communities are rising for justice, there is unprecedented recognition that criminalization has denied Black people their inherent civil rights and liberties.  The campaign undermines tactics white supremacists use to divide diverse immigrant communities and others targeted for hate.

 In the weeks before the election, it celebrates the power of immigrants and returning citizens who may not be able to vote, but still have the power to encourage their families and friends to vote and to engage in their communities.

  This campaign celebrates the strength in solidarity between and among communities. 

Black Justice is Immigrant Justice, Black Justice is Asian American Justice, Black Justice is LGBTQ Justice, Black Justice is Muslim Justice.  Black Justice is Our Justice.

Learn More About White Nationalist Groups: Information about White Nationalist Groups Whose Actions are Not Protected by the Constitution and About State Laws to Combat Them – Share with Local Government and Law Enforcement Leaders

Institute for Constitutional Advocacy (ICAP), Addressing the Rise of Unlawful Paramilitaries, with 50 state surveys and information sheets about laws to enforce against militia groups (2020) In anticipation of possible unlawful militias intimidating voters at the polls, Georgetown Law’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection (ICAP) has released fact sheets on unlawful militias for all 50 states.  The fact sheets provide key information about lawful and unlawful militias, state laws prohibiting private militias and paramilitary activity, and what to do if citizens see groups of armed individuals near polling places.

AJC Global Jewish Advocacy, Position Paper: QAnon (2020) AJC provides a background on QAnon, a loosely organized, far-right network of people who believe the world is controlled by a satanic cabal of pedophiles and cannibals, made up of politicians (mostly Democrats), mainstream media, journalists, and Hollywood entertainers. AJC calls on federal, state and local government officials to unequivocally condemn QAnon, and for the I to investigate their connections to domestic terrorism activity.

The Brennan Center, Hidden in Plain Sight: Racism, White Supremacy, and Far-Right Militancy in Law Enforcement with Recommendations for Federal, State, and Local Leaders (2020) After a self -described local militia member shot and killed an anti-racist protestor in Kenosha, videos of local law enforcement offering the shooter and other white militia members water and gratitude quickly surfaced.  More recently, in a bizarre and deeply disturbing video, a Sheriff in Michigan defended local far-right militia members who attempted to kidnap the Governor. In Ft. Worth, Texas, a police officer was fired after an investigation into his racist social media activity. This report includes recommendations for all levels of government.

Источник: https://civilrights.org/heres-10-things-you-can-do-to-stop-white-supremacy/

Origins of Neo-Nazi and White Supremacist Terms and Symbols: A Glossary

How to Seek Support When Experiencing White Supremacist Harm

The eruption of neo-Nazism and White Supremacy across the country has exposed the public to symbols, terms, and ideology drawn directly from Nazi Germany and Holocaust-era fascist movements. Some of those who attacked the US Capitol on January 6 were displaying neo-Nazi, antisemitic, and white supremacist symbols, several of which glorified the Holocaust.

The leaders of today’s Neo-Nazi and White Supremacist organizations are not Adolf Hitler, and America is not Germany, but, in order to understand their agenda, it is vital to understand the history of these code words, symbols, and ideologies. See more resources for confronting hate below.

Nazi Flags and Crosses

For centuries, flags have served as symbols of national pride. People also use them to show allegiance to a specific cause or movement. The most widespread Nazi flag featured a black swastika in a white circle on a red field. Other official flags were also displayed during the Nazi regime.

The German armed forces, for example, flew a modified version of the much older Imperial Reich war flag. That flag featured horizontal and vertical black bands intersected by the Prussian eagle. It also included an iron cross, a traditional German military decoration.

In the Nazi version, the swastika replaced the eagle and the background was changed to red.

Nazi Racial Ideology

Hitler was obsessed with race long before becoming Chancellor of Germany. His speeches and writings spread his belief that the world was engaged in an endless racial struggle. White Nordic people topped the racial hierarchy; Slavs, Blacks, and Arabs were lower, and Jews, who were believed to be an existential threat to the “Aryan Master race,” were at the very bottom.

When the Nazis came to power, these beliefs became government ideology and were spread publicly in posters, radio, movies, classrooms and newspapers.

They also served as a basis for a campaign to reorder German society, first through the exclusion of Jews from public life, then the murder of disabled Germans as well as Slavs and, ultimately, the effort to exterminate European Jewry.

“Blood and Soil”

“Blood and Soil” (Blut und Boden) was an early Nazi slogan used in Germany to evoke the idea of a pure “Aryan” race and the territory it wanted to conquer. The concept was foundational to Nazi ideology and its appeal, though it predates the Nazi regime. Blood referred to the goal of a “racially pure” Aryan people.

Soil invoked a mystical vision of the special relationship between the Germanic people and their land. It was also a tool to justify land seizures in eastern Europe and the forced expulsion of local populations in favor of ethnic Germans.

The term was a rallying cry during the 1920s and early 30s when the Nazis and other far right political parties were in opposition to the fledgling Weimar democracy.

“Alien,” “Parasite,” “Degenerate”

In order to make Jewish persecution publicly palatable, Nazi propagandists branded Jews as a biological threat to Germany. Government-sponsored racist propaganda was widely distributed denouncing Jews as “alien,” and “parasitic,” and responsible for Germany’s cultural, political, and economic “degeneration.

” These words had an enormous effect, creating an environment in which persecution and violence were acceptable. Students burned books by Jewish authors on pyres and purged works of art and music by Jews and others considered “un-German.

” Much worse, Jews became less human in German eyes, and less worthy of society’s protection.

Ethnic Cleansing

The term “ethnic cleansing” has been used in recent decades as a euphemism for forcing one group of people from their homes—or even killing them—to create a “racially pure” area for another group.

The effects have been devastating in places such as the former Yugoslavia, where more than 100,000 people were killed in the 1990s, most of them Bosniak Muslims.

The Nazis used a similar euphemism, Säuberung, which means purging or cleansing, to refer to efforts to systematically murder the Jews of Europe.

‘Heil’ and the Nazi Salute

After the Nazi rise to power in Germany in the 1930s, it became common for Germans to greet each other with a stiff-armed salute and the words “Heil Hitler.

” The “German Greeting,” as it became known, was a ritual of the cult of Adolf Hitler. Under the Nazi regime, Germans were expected to pay public allegiance to the “Führer” (leader) in quasi-religious forms.

For example, they even saluted statues of Hitler.

“Jewish Communists”

In the 1920s and 1930s, Nazis were, in part, defined by their opposition to communism. After the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, Germany seemed vulnerable to the spread of communism, particularly after a communist uprising in Berlin.

The Weimar democratic government was unstable, and its economy was in shambles. In their struggle against socialists and communists, fascists and other right-wing groups exploited the fact some prominent communists were Jews to harness antisemitism for their cause.

Longstanding false links between Jews and Communism also underscored antisemitic conspiracy theories about Jewish global domination.

Nazi Colors (black, white, and red)

The Nazis were deliberate in their use of graphic design and color in ways we might today call branding. Adolf Hitler created the flag himself, borrowing the colors of the German Empire that fell at the end of World War I, and implicitly rejecting democracy by harkening back to authoritarian rule.

The colors and design appear in countless Nazi flags, posters, armbands, and other insignia, falsely conveying continuity between the “glorious” imperial past and the Nazi regime.

Hitler wrote: “In red we see the social idea of the movement, in white the nationalistic idea, in the swastika the mission of the struggle for the victory of the Aryan man.”

Swastika

The swastika has an extensive history and enduring power, predominantly as a symbol of hate. It was used at least 5,000 years before Adolf Hitler appropriated it for the Nazi flag featuring a black swastika at its center.

The word derives from the Sanskrit svastika, which means “good fortune” or “well-being.

” Closely identified with “Aryan” civilization in India (referring to Indo-European settlers as opposed to the indigenous population), the swastika was adopted by right-wing groups in early 20th century Germany to represent the racial superiority of “Aryans” whom they equated with “Nordic” or “German-blooded” people in contrast to Jews and other minorities. It is used almost exclusively to invoke Nazi tyranny and intimidate anyone who does not subscribe to white supremacist views.

Torches and Fire

The Nazis were masters of propaganda who regularly used torches and fire in spectacles to create drama and show force. Torchlight marches were a frequent and carefully staged feature of Nazi rallies. On January 30, 1933, torchlight parades announced the onset of the Nazi regime as Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany.

The famous Leni Riefenstahl film Triumph of the Will featured dramatic footage of torch bearers at a 1934 Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg marching in choreographed formation to form a massive human swastika.

In addition, at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, as part of a calculated strategy to link their racist vision with a more ancient past, the organizers reintroduced the ritual of the torch relay to light the Olympic flame.

“Vermin,” “Disease”

Nazi propagandists built on existing stereotypes and antisemitic beliefs to directly link Jews to the spread of disease and pestilence. As part of their racial campaign to “cleanse” society, Nazi leaders implemented “racial hygiene” policies to “protect” non-Jews.

For example, in occupied Poland, the Nazis reinforced their policy of confining Jews to ghettos by portraying them as a health threat requiring quarantine, while creating a self-fulfilling prophecy by severely limiting access to food, water, and medicine to those imprisoned there.

German “educational” films shown to thousands of Polish school children characterized “the Jew” as a carrier of lice and typhus.

Additional Resources

Источник: https://www.ushmm.org/antisemitism/what-is-antisemitism/origins-of-neo-nazi-and-white-supremacist-terms-and-symbols

U.S. Businesses Must Take Meaningful Action Against Racism

How to Seek Support When Experiencing White Supremacist Harm
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The United States is in crisis. As we write this article, videos of racial violence and racist threats toward Black people in America flood social and news media channels.

Public demonstrations against injustice are happening in at least 30 localities. During non-violent protests, other parties have engaged in vandalism and looting, spurring varied and often disproportionate police response.

Several cities are burning, while Covid-19 continues to rage throughout the country, hitting minority communities the hardest.

In a week that focused on “reopening the economy,” everyone has become keenly aware that there is more than one pandemic affecting U.S. lives and local economies. As the American Psychological Association has declared, “we are living in a racism pandemic” too. World leaders are weighing in. The United Nations has urged action from U.S. authorities.

No matter your racial, political, or other identity, these events are almost impossible to escape. In particular, millions of Black people and their allies are hurting. And these issues are not ones that organizations or their leaders — from CEOs at the top of the hierarchy to team managers on the frontline — can ignore.

While conventional diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives focus on employee engagement and belonging, today’s challenges reach far beyond marginalization in the workplace.

We now see and hear Black people who are suffering from the weight of dehumanizing injustice and the open wound of racism that has been festering for centuries.

Black leaders Robert Sellers, the University of Michigan’s vice provost for equity and inclusion and chief diversity officer, are openly sharing their feelings of exasperation. Blogs Danielle Cadet’s caution readers that “Your black colleagues may look they’re okay – chances are they’re not.

” Another social media message that has gone viral really struck us: “There are black men and women in Zoom meetings maintaining ‘professionalism,’ biting their tongues, holding back tears and swallowing rage, while we endure attacks from a pandemic and police. Understand and be mindful.”

The psychological impact of these public events — and the way it carries over into the workplace — cannot be overstated.

Research shows that how organizations respond to large-scale, diversity-related events that receive significant media attention can either help employees feel psychologically safe or contribute to racial identity threat and mistrust of institutions of authority.

Without adequate support, minority employees are ly to perceive their environments as more interpersonally and institutionally biased against them. Leaders seeking to create an inclusive environment for everyone must find ways to address these topics.

Avoiding Missteps

First, we’d to outline three common missteps to avoid.

Keeping silent. For people not directly impacted by these events, the default response is often silence. Many Whites avoid talking about race because they fear being seen as prejudiced, so they adopt strategic colorblindness instead. We know that many managers also think they lack the skills to have difficult conversations around differences.

But no one has the perfect words to address atrocities in our society. It is the leader’s responsibility to try, conveying care and concern for all employees but especially targeted groups.

As Desmond Tutu once said, “If you are neutral in the situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.” You might be tempted to rest on the laurels of your organizations’ diversity statements and active employee resource groups. But that is not enough. The words of Dr.

Martin Luther King remind us: “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

Becoming overly defensive. Another common misstep when approaching uncomfortable conversations about racial injustice is to react defensively, especially when our world views, positions, or advantages are questioned or challenged.

Robin DiAngelo’s research on white fragility highlights this phenomenon. For instance, when learning about police brutality against unarmed Black people, one reaction might be to search for evidence about what the victim did to deserve abuse, rather than demonstrating compassion and empathy.

Another example is diminishing protesters by focusing on and judging those who engaged in looting instead of discussing the unjust act that drove people to the streets. Leaders must resist such reactions because they do not allow for constructive engagement.

Instead, they make members of targeted groups feel even more alienated. Remember that comments on systemic inequalities are not personal attacks.

Overgeneralizing. When triggering events occur, there is a tendency to make sweeping generalizations about groups of people involved in the public conflict.

Though individuals of the same race, gender or other identity often have shared experiences, there is diversity within groups that should be recognized.

Instead of presuming that all members of your in-group or out-group think and feel similarly and talking about what “everybody knows,” how “all of us feel,” and what “none of us would ever do,” leave room for dissenting points of view.

When in doubt, ask employees about their individual experiences to honor their uniqueness. Think about how you can allow your employees to discuss what’s happening without putting them on the spot or asking them to speak for everyone in their identity group.

Best Buy’s senior leadership team offered one of the first corporate statements acknowledging the death of George Floyd under a white police officer’s knee in Minnesota, the harassment of bird-watcher Christian Cooper by a white woman in New York City, and the death of jogger Ahmaud Arbery at the hands of armed white gunman in Georgia, while also paying service to the fact that the Black experience in America is not monolithic: “We write about these … events … not because most of us know what this fear must be . We are as a group, by and large, not people of color. We write this not because most of us have known anyone personally in a situation this. Thankfully, most of us do not. We write this because it could have been any one of our friends or colleagues at Best Buy, or in our personal lives, lying on the ground, struggling to breathe or filming someone as they threatened us.”

Citigroup CEO Mike Corbat acknowledged that many employees have experienced racism in their everyday lives in overt and subtle ways. “I want you to know that your colleagues and I will always stand with you,” he said in a memo to employees. “While I can try to empathize with what it must be to be a black person in America, I haven’t walked in those shoes.”

Taking Meaningful Action

Next, we’d to provide a framework for meaningful action. Leaders must not only offer physical and psychological safety. They also have the power and platform to lead change. Statements from the top are valuable, but they are just a start.

Anyone, at any level of the organization, can take small steps to exercise greater compassion and initiate action that provides needed support and promotes racial justice for Black workers as well as others who are marginalized.

Managers have a particularly important role in connecting with their employees on these issues.  Here’s how:

Acknowledge. It’s important to acknowledge any harm that your Black and brown coworkers have endured. This means committing to lifelong learning about racism. Seek the facts about racist events, as well as the aggressions and microagressions that your minority coworkers have most ly faced inside and outside of your organization.  We suggest the following steps:

  • Do the research to fully understand events, using data from reliable sources. Take the initiative to search beyond social media.
  • Do give your Black and brown employees the space to be angry, afraid, disenchanted, or even disengaged from work.
  • Do seek out support from your human resources team or office of diversity and inclusion. Books and articles can also be good resources. Three we recommend are: Race, Work and Leadership: New Perspectives on the Black Experience , which one of us edited and to which we both contributed, as well as the related HBR article series “Toward a Racially Just Workplace”; The Person You Mean to Be by Dolly Chugh, and How to Be Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi. There are also free resources such as the “Talking about Race” web portal from the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
  • Do not rely on Black and brown people to educate you about what happened in order to justify their hurt and outrage or counter “colorblind” rhetoric.
  • Do not ask your Black and brown leaders or employees to comfort or advocate for colleagues or justice initiatives.

In the organizational setting, you have the power to step up. JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon and the company’s diversity chief Brian Lamb wrote a memo to U.S.

employees stating: “This week’s terrible events in Minneapolis, together with too many others occurring around our country, are tragic and heartbreaking.

Let us be clear — we are watching, listening and want every single one of you to know we are committed to fighting against racism and discrimination wherever and however it exists.”

At Georgetown University, president John DeGioia wrote a heartfelt message to the community acknowledging the harm of a series of racist events: “On too many occasions over the years, there has been cause for me to share reflections with our community, as we grapple with the devastating impact of racism and hatred in our nation.  In August 2014, following the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri; in December 2015, following the grand jury decision in the killing of Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York; in August 2017, following the march of white supremacists and neo-Nazis in Charlottesville, Virginia.  In these moments, which encompass far from the full extent of experiences of racism and racist violence, I have tried to frame the work in which we must engage within the mission and purpose of the Academy.”

Affirm. People are looking for leaders to affirm their right to safety and personhood and help them feel protected. When presidents, governors, mayors and sheriffs aren’t doing so, corporate, university, and non-profit leaders can.

This means offering continued opportunities for reaction, reflection, conversation, growth, development, impact, and advancement. Affirmation can start with creating a space for employees to share.

For example, when asked, “How are you today?” many people of color respond in a scripted manner, instead of answering honestly. Instead, use more thoughtful prompts and questions.

You might say something this: “I’ve been thinking about the harm of racism in our country, especially considering recent events.” Next, describe your personal reaction and concerns, then make a commitment. “I’d to help in promoting equity, so here’s one thing I plan to do to help prevent future tragedies these.” Explain those intentions. Then, offer to engage.

“Please let me know if there’s anything else I can do to be supportive, even if you just want to talk about what’s happening. I understand if you don’t, and I won’t be offended. But I just want you to know that the door is open, and that I care.” The last line is important.

Not everyone will be interested in or comfortable with discussing racism at work, especially if they haven’t built a solid foundation of trust.

Act. Think critically about how you can use your power to effect change. Employees value words of understanding and encouragement, but leaders’ and organizations’ actions have a more lasting impact.

We have witnessed some courageous steps, such as Joan Gabel, president of the University of Minnesota, ending contracts with the Minneapolis Police Department after George Floyd’s death.

Franklin Templeton Investments fired executive employee Amy Cooper after her interaction with Chris Cooper in Central Park.

Georgetown president John DeGioia’s statement went on to say: “Our role in society — to pursue the truth — through the methodologies and disciplines through which we establish knowledge in our world, demands our engagement.

  In our response, we have sought to accelerate our academic commitment to addressing racial justice and to address our own connection to the institution of slavery and the enduring legacy of racism and to undo the structural elements that sustain this legacy.”

More examples include pledging $1 million to the Center for Policing Equity, Glossier giving $500,000 to support racial justice organizations and another $500,000 to Black-owned beauty brands, and Peloton not only donating $500,000 to the NAACP but also calling for its members to speak up for and learn ways to practice anti-racism.

What can you and your organization do in your community? What would promote equity and justice and activate meaningful change?  Whether you are a senior or junior leader, how can you advocate for such action?

Racism isn’t just Black people’s problem; it’s everyone’s problem because it erodes the fabric of society. Leaders at every level must use their power, platforms, and resources to help employees and communities overcome these challenges and build a better world for us all.

Источник: https://hbr.org/2020/06/u-s-businesses-must-take-meaningful-action-against-racism

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