Hearing vs. Listening: Learn the Difference and How Each Impact Mental Health

Содержание
  1. Hearing vs Listening — Mastering Communication
  2. Definitions: Hearing vs. Listening
  3. Active listening:
  4. Passive listening:
  5. Continuous vs. Temporary:
  6. Involuntary vs. Voluntary:
  7. Reasons Hearing is Different from Listening
  8. The Physiological Reason:
  9. The Emotional Reason:
  10. How to Be an Active Listener
  11. 1. Ask good questions:
  12. 2. Be curious:
  13. 3. Wait to speak:
  14. 4. Stay focused:
  15. 5. Don’t fill in holes:
  16. Foundations of Effective Communication
  17. Benefits of Listening
  18. The Bottom Line: From Hear to Here
  19. What are the signs and symptoms of psychosis?
  20. How can the NHS help me?
  21. How can adult social services help me?
  22. What other help is available?
  23. What treatment should the NHS offer me?
  24. Medication
  25. Talking therapies
  26. What if I am not happy with my treatment?
  27. Treatment options
  28. Second opinion
  29. Advocacy
  30. The Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS)
  31. Complaints
  32. The Difference Between Hearing and Listening
  33. What is hearing?
  34. What is listening?
  35. Passive vs. active listening
  36. Understanding the differences between listening and hearing
  37. How listening and hearing can affect our mental health
  38. Tips for becoming a better listener
  39. Cities:
  40. Difference Between Hearing and Listening (with Comparison Chart)
  41. Content: Hearing Vs Listening
  42. Comparison Chart
  43. Definition of Hearing
  44. Definition of Listening
  45. Conclusion
  46. Language and Speech Disorders in Children | CDC
  47. Helping children learn language
  48. What to do if there are concerns
  49. Detecting problems with language or speech
  50. Treatment for language or speech disorders and delays
  51. What every parent should know
  52. The role of healthcare providers
  53. More information

Hearing vs Listening — Mastering Communication

Hearing vs. Listening: Learn the Difference and How Each Impact Mental Health

While some people may use the words hearing and listening as synonyms, there’s nuance between hearing vs. listening. One is more active and requires effort, while the other is involuntary and natural. To master learning and communication, it takes both hearing and listening.

Let’s understand the differences so that mastering communication can be an achievable goal. This will help in school, in work, and in life overall.

Definitions: Hearing vs. Listening

According to the dictionary, hearing is defined as “the process, function or power of perceiving a sound.”

On the other hand, the same dictionary defines listening as “to hear something with thoughtful attention.”

In their definitions alone, it’s clear to see the big difference between the two. Listening requires attention, meaning it’s active. Hearing is passive — you can’t close your ears, so sounds will enter and be heard. This makes it involuntary.

Active listening:

The listener is attempting to really internalize and understand what they are hearing. This requires motivation and purpose. The listener has an intention to connect and participate.

Passive listening:

Exhibits itself when the listener is disconnected and is unreceptive.

Continuous vs. Temporary:

Hearing is continuous. You will hear sounds all day because it’s a physiological aspect of being. However, listening is temporary because it requires attention and focus, which can’t be given at every hour of the day. As such, listening becomes psychological.

Involuntary vs. Voluntary:

Hearing is involuntary, meaning you don’t choose to do it. That’s why you can hear people talking, but you can choose not to listen and focus on what they are saying. This is the phrase “in one ear, out the other.”

Reasons Hearing is Different from Listening

Listening requires patience and practice. This is a few different reasons, including:

The Physiological Reason:

Our brain can actually process words faster than people can speak them. The difference is major. People speak, on average, 125 words per minute, but our brains are capable to take in 800 words per minute. That’s why we can take in words, but still think be thinking as the words are coming in.

The Emotional Reason:

The amount at which we listen depends on how much we care. The depth at which we care can help to curtail the side thoughts that enter our mind when we are listening to someone talk.

How to Be an Active Listener

Active listening requires attention and care. Here are ways in which you can practice being an active listener:

1. Ask good questions:

When listening attentively, you can ask good questions. You can follow what the speaker is trying to convey and respond back with detailed and accurate questions to push the conversation further.

2. Be curious:

With anything in life, curiosity has the power to take us to greater levels. When you express curiosity during listening and genuinely want to know more, you will be better focused and pay attention.

3. Wait to speak:

One of the main tenets and sometimes the hardest part about being a listener is not interrupting. To actively listen, you have to rely on the cues that someone is done speaking before you open your mouth to talk. This comes in the form of hearing them close a sentence or thought, as well as non-verbal cues.

4. Stay focused:

Being focused means that you have to silence the other thoughts in your mind and pay attention to the words being spoken. One way you can practice on your focus outside of active listening can be meditation.

This practice will help you learn how to be present so that when you are in the middle of a conversation, your mind is focused on what is happening with the other person, rather than thoughts about the past or future.

5. Don’t fill in holes:

If there’s a part of someone’s story that feels missing, don’t fill in the blanks yourself. Instead, ask the questions that will help you clarify and make better sense of the information.

Foundations of Effective Communication

Effective communication builds relationships. It also is a major part of learning and solving problems. When it comes to all aspects of life, you will want to be a good communicator to accomplish your goals and move things forward. Some of the foundations of effective communication include:

  • Finding meaning
  • Not interrupting
  • Asking specific questions
  • Restating what the other person is saying

Benefits of Listening

Today, we live in a world where we have so many different ways to communicate. However, with so much information circulating, it can be hard to remember things we hear. That’s why active listening is so important.

It’s also one of the reasons that podcasts and the digital revolution of audio entertainment is moving forward full-throttle. We all love stories, and some of the best ways we remember and understand them is by listening.

Listening is also a way that we feel understood. Since active listening requires the other person to focus and care about what we are saying, it is how we know that they are understanding our thoughts, feelings and desires. By listening, we are able to:

  • Forge strong and genuine friendships
  • Understand and exchange knowledge
  • Share information and memories
  • Pass on ideas and stories down to the next generation
  • Discuss and resolve conflicts
  • Create better solutions to existing problems

The Bottom Line: From Hear to Here

Ears give people the ability to hear, but listening gives people the ability to be here and in the present. Listening makes understanding happen, so that communication is actionable and insightful.

While you can’t practice how you hear, you can practice and hone the skills for how you listen. Understanding the difference between hearing vs listening is one step in being able to master good communication skills.

Источник: https://www.uopeople.edu/blog/hearing-vs-listening/

What are the signs and symptoms of psychosis?

Hearing vs. Listening: Learn the Difference and How Each Impact Mental Health

You may decide to get help for your experiences. You can get help from:

  • The NHS
  • Adult social services
  • Charities
  • Self help

How can the NHS help me?

You can speak to your GP about your concerns. They will be able to talk to you about treatment options and coping strategies. You don’t have to do what your GP thinks that you should do. But you should listen to them. Make sure that you understand the pros and cons of your treatment options before you make a decision.

Your GP should not give you antipsychotic medication without first talking to a psychiatrist.

Your GP should refer you to a secondary mental health team if this is the first time that you have experienced psychosis and asked for help. You should be assessed quickly. A secondary mental health team will usually be called the:

  • early intervention team (EIT)
  • community mental health team (CMHT), or
  • crisis team.

You or your carer should be able to make a self-referral to a secondary mental health team if this is the first time that you have experienced psychosis.

EIT’s specialise in helping people who experience psychosis for the first time. But they aren’t available in all areas of England. To find your local secondary mental health team you can try the following.

  • You can ask your GP for their details.
  • You can call NHS 111.
  • Use an internet search engine. Use a term ‘‘community mental health team in Cheshire’ or ‘early intervention in psychosis Camden’.

There is more information about this in the section below.

Support under the care programme approach
Secondary mental health teams can support you using a package of care called, ‘Care Programme Approach.

’ This means that you will have a care coordinator and a care plan. A care coordinator will have regular contact with you. And they will manage your care plan to make sure that you get the help that you need.

This can include both treatment and social care needs.

Support for physical health
You are at a higher risk of physical health issues if you have a mental illness. Your risks can include being overweight, having coronary heart disease or diabetes.

Because of the increased risk you should have regular physical health checks. Such as a full health check including weight, blood pressure and other blood tests when you start antipsychotic medication.

It could also include:

  • a combined healthy eating and physical activity programme.
  • support to help you to stop smoking.

How can adult social services help me?

Your local authority is responsible for your social care and support. The social services team are part of the local authority.

If you need help and support to look after yourself then you can have an assessment by social services. For example, you may need support so that you can:

  • get the house,
  • keep in touch with friends and family,
  • get a job or take part in education,
  • clean your house,
  • prepare meals or go shopping,
  • keep safe,
  • manage your money,
  • take part in leisure activities, or
  • contribute to society. For example, volunteer, or be in a group.

What other help is available?

Charities
In some areas, charities will support people who experience psychosis. This may be through support groups where you can talk to other people who have experience of psychosis. Or there may be a different service available for you, such as employment or isolation support.

You can look on our website to see if we have any support groups or services in your area. Click on ‘Help in your area’ at the top of the webpage.

Some of the other national mental health charities are:

  • Mind,
  • Richmond Fellowship,
  • Together, and
  • Turning Point.

You can look on their websites to see what support they offer in your area.

If you would us to look for you please contact our advice line on 0300 5000 927 and let us know what sort of support you are looking for.

Self-help

There are things that you can do to help manage your mental health. This is called ‘self-help.’ You can read more about self-help below. You can find more information about:

  • NHS Mental Health Teams (MHTs) here.
  • Care Programme Approach by clicking here.
  • Social care assessment — under the Care Act 2014 by clicking here.

What treatment should the NHS offer me?

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend that you should be offered antipsychotic medication and talking therapy if you experience psychosis. If you decide not to take medication you should still be offered talking therapy.

NICE produce guidelines for how health professionals should treat certain conditions. You can download these from their website at www.nice.org.uk.

Your GP may refer you to a specialist mental health team such as the early intervention team (EIT), community mental health team (CMHT), or crisis team.

Medication

Antipsychotic medication can help with psychosis. Your doctor should give you information about antipsychotics including side effects. You and your doctor should choose the medication together.

Some people find that they do not start to recover until they get the right medication. It is important to take the medication every day to help your symptoms.

Try not to be too upset if the first antipsychotic that you try doesn’t help. There are lots of different antipsychotics to try because people respond to different medications.

Some may not improve your symptoms and cause side effects. You should discuss your medication with your doctor if your medication is not working. Or you are finding the side effects hard to deal with.

There might be another medication that will suit you better.

Doctors should check that your medication is working. They should also give you a physical health check 12 weeks after the start of medication and then at least once a year. Some antipsychotic medication can make you put on a lot of weight. So, your weight should be monitored each week for the first 6 weeks.

Talking therapies

There are different types of talking therapies recommended for people who have psychosis.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
CBT can help you understand your experiences and any upsetting and worrying thoughts and beliefs. You can discuss new ways of thinking about them and dealing with them.

What is CBT?
CBT is a talking treatment. It is there to try and help you to:

  • understand links between your thoughts, feeling and actions,
  • understand your symptoms and how they affect your day to day life, and
  • look at your perceptions, beliefs and reasoning.

CBT aims to:

  • help you to be aware of signs that your thoughts, feelings or behaviours are changing,
  • give you a way of coping with your symptoms
  • reduce stress, and
  • improve your functioning.

Family intervention
Family intervention is where you and your family work with mental health professionals to help you to manage your relationships. This should be offered to people who you live with or who you are in close contact with.

The support that you and your family are given will depend on what problems there are and what preferences you all have. This could be group family sessions or individual sessions. Your family should get support for 3 months to 1 year and should have at least 10 planned sessions.

Family intervention can be used to:

  • learn more about your symptoms, and
  • improve communication among family members.

Family intervention could help you and your family to:

  • learn more about your symptoms,
  • understand what is happening to you,
  • improve communication with each other,
  • know how to support each other,
  • think positively,
  • become more independent,
  • be able to solve problems with each other,
  • know how to manage a crisis, and improve mental wellbeing.

Art therapy
Art therapy may be more useful if you have depressive symptoms, such as withdrawing from people or losing interest in things that you used to enjoy.

You will have arts therapy with a therapist. It will usually be in a group. It is there to mix different communication techniques with creativity. Art therapy aims to help you to:

  • learn new ways of relating to other people,
  • show how you are feeling,
  • accept your feelings, and
  • understand your feelings.

Therapy for trauma
If you have experienced trauma, your psychosis may be part of your way of dealing with this. This is something which can be treated with counselling or psychotherapy. The therapist will help you to understand the root causes of your hallucinations or delusions. They will explore ways to over-come and control difficult voices and beliefs.

The NHS do not usually offer counselling or psychotherapy to people who are experiencing psychosis. But they should listen to you if you ask for it. Especially if other therapies CBT, family intervention and arts therapies, are not available locally.

You can find more information about:

  • Antipsychotics by clicking here.
  • Medication. Choice and managing problems by clicking here.
  • Talking therapies by clicking here.

What if I am not happy with my treatment?

If you are not happy with your treatment you can:

  • talk to your doctor about your treatment options,
  • ask for a second opinion,
  • get an advocate to help you speak to your doctor,
  • contact Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) and see whether they can help, or
  • make a complaint.

There is more information about these options below.

Treatment options

You should first speak to your doctor about your treatment. Explain why you are not happy with it. You could ask what other treatments you could try.

Tell your doctor if there is a type of treatment that you would to try. Doctors should listen to your preference. If you are not given this treatment, ask your doctor to explain why it is not suitable for you.

Second opinion

A second opinion means that you would a different doctor to give their opinion about what treatment you should have. You can also ask for a second opinion if you disagree with your diagnosis.

You don’t have a right to a second opinion. But your doctor should listen to your reason for wanting a second opinion.

Advocacy

An advocate is independent from the mental health service. They are free to use. They can be useful if you find it difficult to get your views heard.

There are different types of advocates available. Community advocates can support you to get a health professional to listen to your concerns. And help you to get the treatment that you would .

You can search online to search for a local advocacy service. If you can’t find a service you can call our advice service on 0300 5000 927. We will look for you. But this type of service doesn’t exist in all areas.

The Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS)

PALS is part of the NHS. They give information and support to patients.

You can find your local PALS’ details through this website link:
www.nhs.uk/Service-Search/Patient-advice-and-liaison-services-(PALS)/LocationSearch/363.

Complaints

If you can’t sort your problem, you can make a complaint. Your concerns investigated in more detail.

If you can’t sort your problem, you can make a complaint. This is where your concerns are investigated in further detail.

You can ask an advocate to help you make a complaint. Advocates that do this are called Independent Health Complaints Advocates. They are free to use and don’t work for the NHS.

You can find out more about:

  • Medication — Choice and managing problems by clicking here.
  • Second opinions by clicking here.
  • Advocacy by clicking here.
  • Complaining about the NHS or social services by clicking here.

Источник: https://www.rethink.org/advice-and-information/about-mental-illness/learn-more-about-conditions/psychosis/

The Difference Between Hearing and Listening

Hearing vs. Listening: Learn the Difference and How Each Impact Mental Health

  • Many individuals interchange the words “hearing” and “listening” and mistake them for the same meaning.
  • The definition of hearing revolves around the physiological act of hearing sounds.
  • The definition of listening revolves around actively paying attention to the words and sounds that you hear to absorb their meaning.
  • When we choose not to listen to someone, whether our spouse, coworker, friend, or child, we potentially create a rift in the relationship.

Have you ever heard someone say: “You might be hearing me, but you’re not listening to me”?

Many individuals often interchange the words “hearing” and “listening” and mistake them for the same meaning.

Although they share some similarities, there are significant differences between the two, with one being more active, requiring effort, and the other being involuntary and natural.

To master communication and learning and be successful in interpersonal relationships, it is essential to become successful at listening and hearing.

What is hearing?

The definition of hearing revolves around the physiological act of hearing sounds. Merriam-Webster defines hearing as the “process, function, or power of perceiving sound; specifically: the special sense by which noises and tones are received as stimuli.”

Hearing is a passive, physical act that requires one sense and has to do with the perception of sound. It does not rely on concentration. Hearing is collecting data; we hear sounds and words all day long, even if we are not paying attention to them.

What is listening?

The definition of listening revolves around actively paying attention to the words and sounds that you hear to absorb their meaning and develop an emotional response. Merriam-Webster defines listening as the “to hear something with thoughtful attention.” Listening is a mental, active process that requires multiple senses.

Listening is a voluntary act, meaning that an individual can choose whether or not to hear. If you choose to listen, then it is an active process. You can hear sounds and words without having to listen or focus on what you are hearing.

Hearing without listening is an example of the common phrase “in one ear and out the other”

Passive vs. active listening

Listening can be broken down into one step further: active and passive listening. Experts often use these terms in the communication world when talking about healthy relationships among peers, coworkers, romantic partners, friends, and family members.

Active listening requires curiosity, motivation, purpose, and effort. The active listener attempts to internalize and understand what they are hearing to connect with the other person and participate in a meaningful conversation. In other words, active listening is the way you want to listen if you want to understand or if you are looking to solve a problem with another individual.

On the opposite end of the listening spectrum is passive listening. Passive listening is listening that is characterized as being disconnected, inattentive, and unreceptive.

A passive listener has no desire to contribute effectively to the conversation. A passive listener most ly already has an opinion formed and is unwilling to work with the other individual to come to a solution.

Passive listening is not a great way to communicate with people you are striving to form relationships with.

Understanding the differences between listening and hearing

  • Listening is an active process, whereas hearing is a passive process
  • Listening requires paying attention, whereas hearing requires no concentration or attention skills
  • Listening requires empathy, curiosity, and motivation, whereas hearing is associated with being disconnected
  • Listening is a skill that is necessary to have effective communication, whereas hearing is not a great communication skill.
  • Listening is an internal behavior that involves both the mind and body, whereas hearing is a physical act that only involves the ears.

How listening and hearing can affect our mental health

Hearing and listening and the lack of each can drastically affect our mental health. Here’s how:

When we choose not to listen to someone, whether our spouse, coworker, peer, friend, or child, we potentially create a rift in the relationship. Sometimes we choose not to listen to another individual because we are too busy or do not want to hear what they say.

In other words, we are telling this individual that what they are saying and feeling is not essential at the moment, and as a result, we are minimizing them.

By not listening to someone or passively listening, we are causing strain on that relationship, which can eventually affect our mental health.

On the other hand, if we choose to listen actively and engage with others, we are showing them that they matter and forming an alliance, and strengthening relationships. Choosing to listen to another individual actively is a good quality to have, and it can bring bountiful relationships into our life.

By actively listening and engaging with other individuals, we can:

  • Create strong and genuine friendships
  • Understand and exchange knowledge
  • Share memories
  • Pass on stories and ideas to the next generation
  • Resolve conflicts and create better solutions for the future

The loss of hearing can also have a drastic effect on our mental health. Although hearing is an inactive, physical process, it is an important sense that enables us to move around and adapt to our environment.

Although we can still learn to listen to others without hearing (sign language and body language), losing our ability to hear can potentially lead to social isolation and depression. A study found that cognitive decline happens more rapidly in individuals with hearing loss than in those with normal hearing.

Health care professionals should be aware of an increased risk for depression among adults with hearing loss.

Tips for becoming a better listener

Now that you know the difference between listening (active vs. passive) and hearing, you might be interested in learning how to improve your active listening skills to improve your communication skills and better your interpersonal relationships.

Ask good questions

We all know what it is to share something with someone, and their response is “okay” or “oh”. It feels defeating and is obvious they are not listening or not interested in engaging in the conversation.

Active listening requires asking open-ended questions and genuinely being curious about the conversation. When someone shares something with you, take it upon yourself to learn more by asking thoughtful questions.

By asking who/what/where/when/how questions pertain to what the other individual is talking about demonstrates that you are listening and want to learn more.

Wait to speak

As humans, we simply listen just so we can speak. We love to hear ourselves talk. We often interrupt others before they are finished speaking. To be a good active listener, we must wait until the other individual is done talking and sharing their ideas.

We do this by relying on cues that someone is done speaking. This comes in the forms of non-verbal cues or listening to them close a sentence or a thought. Think of listening as paying attention to learn. Concentrate on the words being spoken and be aware of how the words are spoken.

We should take a moment to pause before we share our opinions with others.

Stay focused

Being focused on the conversation means that you have to block out other thoughts and sounds out from your mind to pay attention to the words being spoken. Staying present in the conversation can be challenging but putting away your phone and limiting other distractions are vital to helping you focus on the present conversation.

Get the help you need from a therapist near you–a FREE service from Psychology Today.

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Источник: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/happiness-is-state-mind/202107/the-difference-between-hearing-and-listening

Difference Between Hearing and Listening (with Comparison Chart)

Hearing vs. Listening: Learn the Difference and How Each Impact Mental Health

Someone rightly said, “Hearing is through ears, but listening is through the mind.” The two activities hearing and listening involve the use of ears, but they are different. The hearing is nothing but a sense that helps you receive sound waves and noise by ears. It is the power of perceiving sounds.

On the contrary, listening is when you receive the sound waves and understand it by paying full attention to the words and sentences of the speaker. It is one’s ability to correctly receive and interpret the message transferred by the other party in the process of communication.

For many people, these two activities are one, but the truth is, the difference between hearing and listening is vital. so have a glance at this article to understand the terms completely.

Content: Hearing Vs Listening

  1. Comparison Chart
  2. Definition
  3. Key Differences
  4. Conclusion

Comparison Chart

Basis for ComparisonHearingListening
MeaningHearing refers to one's ability to perceive sounds, by receiving vibrations through ears.Listening is something done consciously, that involve the analysis and understanding of the sounds you hear.
What is it?An abilityA skill
NaturePrimary and continuousSecondary and temporary
ActPhysiologicalPsychological
InvolvesReceipt of message through ears.Interpretation of the message received by ears.
ProcessPassive bodily processActive mental process
Occurs atSubconscious levelConscious level
Use of sensesOnly oneMore than one
ReasonWe are neither aware nor we have any control over the sounds we hear.We listen to acquire knowledge and receive information.
ConcentrationNot requiredRequired

Definition of Hearing

The natural ability or an inborn trait that allows us to recognize sound through ears by catching vibrations is called the hearing. In simple terms, it is one of the five senses; that makes us aware of the sound. It is an involuntary process, whereby a person receives sound vibrations, continuously.

A normal human being’s hearing capability ranges from 20 to 20000 Hertz, called as audio or sonic. Any frequency above and below the given range is known as ultrasonic and infrasonic respectively.

Definition of Listening

Listening is defined as the learned skill, in which we can receive sounds through ears, and transform them into meaningful messages. To put simply, it is the process of diligently hearing and interpreting the meaning of words and sentences spoken by the speaker, during the conversation.

Listening is a bit difficult, because it requires concentration and attention, and the human mind is easily distracted. People use it as a technique to comprehend, what is being said, through different verbal and non-verbal signs, i.e. how it is being said? What type of words is used? Tone and pitch of voice, body language and so on.

Active listening is the key element; that makes the communication process effective. Further, it encompasses making sounds that show listener’s attentiveness and providing feedback. It had a greater influence in our lives and used to gain information, learn and understand things and so on.

The following points are vital so far as the difference between hearing and listening is concerned

  1. An individual’s ability to perceive sounds, by receiving vibrations through ears, is called the hearing. Listening is something done consciously, that involve the analysis and understanding of the sounds you hear.
  2. The hearing is the primary and continuous in nature, i.e. the first and foremost stage is hearing, followed by listening and it occurs continuously. On the other hand, listening is temporary, as we cannot continuously pay attention to something for long hours.
  3. The hearing is physiological, which is through one of our senses in the living organisms. On the contrary, listening is a psychological (conscious) act.
  4. While hearing is a passive bodily process that does not the involve use of the brain. As opposed to listening, it is an active mental process, which involves the use of brain to draw meaning from words and sentences.
  5. Hearing involves receipt of the message through ears. Conversely, listening encompasses interpretation of the message received by ears.
  6. The hearing is an inborn ability but listening is a learned skill.
  7. In the hearing, we are not aware of the sounds that we receive, however in the case of listening, we are completely aware of what the speaker is saying.
  8. Hearing involves the use of only one sense i.e. ears. In contrast, listening, involves the use of more than one senses i.e. eyes, ears, touch etc. to understand the message completely and accurately.
  9. In the hearing, we are neither aware nor we have any control over the sounds we hear. On the other hand, in listening, we are aware of what the other person is saying and so we listen to acquire knowledge and receive information.
  10. Hearing does not require focus whereas listening does.

Conclusion

So, with the discussion, it is quite clear that listening is one step ahead of the hearing. The hearing is simply the ability to hear, i.e.

natural or God-given however, listening is an acquired skill, which only a few people possess.

While the hearing is involuntary and performed effortlessly, listening is done intentionally, wherein we are selective and pay attention to only those messages, we think important for us.

Источник: https://keydifferences.com/difference-between-hearing-and-listening.html

Language and Speech Disorders in Children | CDC

Hearing vs. Listening: Learn the Difference and How Each Impact Mental Health

Children are born ready to learn a language, but they need to learn the language or languages that their family and environment use.

Learning a language takes time, and children vary in how quickly they master milestones in language and speech development.

Typically developing children may have trouble with some sounds, words, and sentences while they are learning. However, most children can use language easily around 5 years of age.

Helping children learn language

Parents and caregivers are the most important teachers during a child’s early years. Children learn language by listening to others speak and by practicing.

Even young babies notice when others repeat and respond to the noises and sounds they make. Children’s language and brain skills get stronger if they hear many different words.

Parents can help their child learn in many different ways, such as

  • Responding to the first sounds, gurgles, and gestures a baby makes.
  • Repeating what the child says and adding to it.
  • Talking about the things that a child sees.
  • Asking questions and listening to the answers.
  • Looking at or reading books.
  • Telling stories.
  • Singing songs and sharing rhymes.

This can happen both during playtime and during daily routines.

Parents can also observe the following:

Learn more about language milestones.  Watch milestones in action.

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Some languages are visual rather than spoken. American Sign Language uses visual signals, including gestures, facial expressions, and body movement to communicate.

What to do if there are concerns

Some children struggle with understanding and speaking and they need help. They may not master the language milestones at the same time as other children, and it may be a sign of a language or speech delay or disorder.

Language development has different parts, and children might have problems with one or more of the following:

  • Understanding what others say (receptive language). This could be due to
    • Not hearing the words (hearing loss).
    • Not understanding the meaning of the words.
  • Communicating thoughts using language (expressive language). This could be due to
    • Not knowing the words to use.
    • Not knowing how to put words together.
    • Knowing the words to use but not being able to express them.

Language and speech disorders can exist together or by themselves. Examples of problems with language and speech development include the following:

  • Speech disorders
    • Difficulty with forming specific words or sounds correctly.
    • Difficulty with making words or sentences flow smoothly, stuttering or stammering.
  • Language delay – the ability to understand and speak develops more slowly than is typical
  • Language disorders
    • Aphasia (difficulty understanding or speaking parts of language due to a brain injury or how the brain works).
    • Auditory processing disorder (difficulty understanding the meaning of the sounds that the ear sends to the brain)

Learn more about language disordersexternal icon.

Language or speech disorders can occur with other learning disorders that affect reading and writing. Children with language disorders may feel frustrated that they cannot understand others or make themselves understood, and they may act out, act helpless, or withdraw.

Language or speech disorders can also be present with emotional or behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or anxiety. Children with developmental disabilities including autism spectrum disorder may also have difficulties with speech and language.

The combination of challenges can make it particularly hard for a child to succeed in school. Properly diagnosing a child’s disorder is crucial so that each child can get the right kind of help.

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Detecting problems with language or speech

If a child has a problem with language or speech development, talk to a healthcare provider about an evaluation. An important first step is to find out if the child may have a hearing loss.

Hearing loss may be difficult to notice particularly if a child has hearing loss only in one ear or has partial hearing loss, which means they can hear some sounds but not others.

Learn more about hearing loss, screening, evaluation, and treatment.

A language development specialist a speech-language pathologistexternal icon will conduct a careful assessment to determine what type of problem with language or speech the child may have.

Overall, learning more than one language does not cause language disorders, but children may not follow exactly the same developmental milestones as those who learn only one language.

Developing the ability to understand and speak in two languages depends on how much practice the child has using both languages, and the kind of practice.

If a child who is learning more than one language has difficulty with language development, careful assessment by a specialist who understands development of skills in more than one language may be needed.

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Treatment for language or speech disorders and delays

Children with language problems often need extra help and special instruction. Speech-language pathologists can work directly with children and their parents, caregivers, and teachers.

Having a language or speech delay or disorder can qualify a child for early interventionexternal icon (for children up to 3 years of age) and special education services (for children aged 3 years and older).

Schools can do their own testing for language or speech disorders to see if a child needs intervention. An evaluation by a healthcare professional is needed if there are other concerns about the child’s hearing, behavior, or emotions.

Parents, healthcare providers, and the school can work together to find the right referrals and treatment.

What every parent should know

Children with specific learning disabilities, including language or speech disorders, are eligible for special education services or accommodations at school under the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA)external icon and Section 504external icon, an anti-discrimination law.

Get help from your state’s Parent Training and Information Centerexternal icon

The role of healthcare providers

Healthcare providers can play an important part in collaborating with schools to help a child with speech or language disorders and delay or other disabilities get the special services they need.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has created a report that describes the roles that healthcare providers can have in helping children with disabilitiesexternal icon, including language or speech disorders.

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More information

CDC Information on Hearing Loss

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disordersexternal icon

Birth to 5: Watch me thriveexternal icon

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Associationexternal icon

Источник: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/language-disorders.html

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