Anonymity Is Last in the 12 Traditions of AA

Содержание
  1. The 12 Traditions of AA: What They Mean
  2. What are the 12 Traditions of AA?
  3. What’s The Difference Between Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
  4. Main Takeaways of the 12 Traditions of AA
  5. Individual Welfare Creates Common Good
  6. AA Has a Spiritual Focus
  7. Is the AA Autonomous?
  8. Is AA Free To Anyone?
  9. AA Must Remain Anonymous
  10. The 12 Steps and 12 Traditions of AA
  11. Focuses of AA
  12. AA and Spirituality
  13. AA and Autonomy
  14. AA is Free
  15. AA and Anonymity
  16. Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions: The Difference
  17. The 12 Steps
  18. What The 12 Steps Mean
  19. The 12 Traditions
  20. What The 12 Traditions Mean
  21. What's Next?
  22. Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous
  23. Long Form
  24. The Twelve Traditions, in both forms, have been reprinted from Twelve Steps And Twelve Traditions, with permission of A.A. World Services, Inc., and are copyright 1952, 1953, and 1981 by the A.A. Grapevine, Inc., and Alcoholics Anonymous Publishing (now known as Alcohlics Anonymous World Services, Inc.). All rights reserved
  25. What The 12 Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous Means And Why Participants Must Follow Them — AA Meeting Locator
  26. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon AA unity.
  27. There is but one ultimate authority for our group purpose – a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
  28. The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.
  29. Each group should be autonomous, except in matters affecting other groups or AA as a whole.
  30. Each group has but one primary purpose: to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.
  31. Our groups should never endorse, finance, or lend our name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest money, property, and prestige problems divert us from our primary purpose.
  32. Every AA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
  33. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever non-professional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
  34. AA, as such, ought never to be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.
  35. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the AA name ought never to be drawn into public controversy.
  36. Our public relations policy is attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
  37. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles above personalities.

The 12 Traditions of AA: What They Mean

Anonymity Is Last in the 12 Traditions of AA

The 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous are known around the world, but the organization also has another set of twelve guiding principles, known as the 12 Traditions of AA.  These 12 traditions outline AA’s philosophies and provide guidelines for members, groups, and the AA society as a whole.

There are two versions of the 12 Traditions of AA—the original long-form version, and the more commonly used shortened version

What are the 12 Traditions of AA?

The condensed version of the AA 12 Traditions is as follows (as taken from aa.org):

  1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon AA unity.
  2. For our group purpose, there is but one ultimate authority—a loving God as he may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
  3. The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.
  4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or AA as a whole.
  5. Each group has but one primary purpose—to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.
  6. An AA group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the AA name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.
  7. Every AA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
  8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
  9. AA, as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.
  10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the AA name ought never be drawn into public controversy.
  11. Our public relations policy is attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
  12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

While Alcoholics Anonymous and the 12 Traditions of AA are there to help you get sober, sometimes you need help from medical professionals. Call 800-839-1686Who Answers? to discuss your treatment options and to get sober safely.

What’s The Difference Between Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions

The AA 12 Steps have become firmly entrenched as a path toward recovery from addictions, not just to alcohol, but to drugs, and other addictions as well.

  These steps, which emphasize acknowledging the problem, seeking help, and continuing to practice healthy behaviors, are a key part of recovery programs of all kinds, and a cornerstone of recovery for over a million alcoholics worldwide.

The AA 12 Traditions, on the other hand, offer a set of spiritual and practical guidelines for governing the AA organization itself. These Traditions establish the practices that allow the organization to stay focused on its one objective: to provide a free, always available, haven for anyone who wants to stop drinking and build a new, sober life.

Main Takeaways of the 12 Traditions of AA

The 12 traditions emphasize looking to a higher power for guidance.

The 12 Traditions of AA are in some ways an extension of the original Twelve Steps, but with a more practical focus on making groups and larger chapters work—all the way to the level of AA’s World Service, the international entity that works with AA and other recovery organizations around the world. The Twelve Traditions of AA emphasize the principles below.

Individual Welfare Creates Common Good

The 12 Traditions state that every member of AA is a part of a greater whole and the welfare of the organization depends on the contributions of everyone at every level.

AA Has a Spiritual Focus

the Twelve Steps, the 12 Traditions of AA state that God is the ultimate authority, or God as the group’s conscience recognizes him to be. The AA 12 Traditions also say that the organization’s longstanding insistence on anonymity has a spiritual purpose too—it helps the organization put principles before individuals and keeps everyone on the same level.

the AA 12 Steps, the higher power or “God” that is referred to in the AA 12 Traditions isn’t of a particular religion or belief, it’s simply a spiritual higher power.

Is the AA Autonomous?

The 12 Traditions stress that every AA group must be responsible for its own governance and a group can consist of any two or three alcoholics who want to form one. Groups should confer and cooperate for the greater good of the organization, with its welfare always the primary consideration.

On an organizational level, too, Alcoholics Anonymous must remain separate from any kind of political or institutional connections. The Twelve Traditions also state that AA groups should never go into business, and while they may work with hospitals, clinics, and other facilities, they must stay independent of them.

What’s more, AA groups must always be supported by voluntary contributions from members and never charge for their services. This keeps the group free of outside influences and preserves the anonymity of its members.

Is AA Free To Anyone?

The Twelve Traditions stipulate that anyone who expresses a desire to stop drinking is welcome at an AA meeting, regardless of where they are on their journey to recovery.

  The group and the organization as a whole must stay focused on the single goal of helping alcoholics get and remain sober without judgment.

For that reason, too, AA shouldn’t establish connections with any organization or institution that could impose its own rules about providing services.

AA Must Remain Anonymous

Anonymity is at the heart of AA’s commitment to helping alcoholics. It protects privacy but also keeps the organization’s focus on its philosophies, rather than its members.

AA members should never express opinions on social or political issues as representatives of AA, though they can do so in their personal lives outside the group.

Since anonymity lets AA put its principles before its personalities, it allows all members to remain humble and serve the organization rather than elevate their own profiles.

For nearly a century, Alcoholics Anonymous has steadily grown from small groups of people helping people to an organization with a worldwide reach. Thanks to the principles of the 12 Steps and the 12 Traditions of AA, it’s done so while staying true to its original goal—to help alcoholics reclaim their lives.

Is alcohol harming your life and relationships? We’re here to help. Contact us at 800-839-1686Who Answers? to get the help you want right now.

Источник: https://alcoholicsanonymous.com/what-are-aas-twelve-traditions/

The 12 Steps and 12 Traditions of AA

Anonymity Is Last in the 12 Traditions of AA

The 12 Steps and the 12 Traditions are the basis of 12-step support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Family support groups (Al-Anon and Alateen) and drug addiction (Narcotics Anonymous) use similar steps. 

AA co-founder Bill Wilson published Twelve Points to Assure Our Future in the AA Grapevine newspaper in 1946. Seven years later, he published his book, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions.

This book is different from the Big Book, which includes the stories of people who used AA to recover from alcoholism.

These books are still available and published by AA World Services and serve as a resource for alcoholics and anyone who wants to learn more about the organization. 

Integrating the 12 Steps and 12 Traditions into your recovery offers a variety of benefits, including:

  • Helps you learn new strategies for overcoming addiction — 12-step meetings provide an opportunity for everyone to share their experiences and recovery journeys. This allows attendees to hear about the experiences of others and use what they can from those stories.
  • Finding peers who share your challenges and experiences — It’s difficult for people who do not have alcohol use disorder (AUD) to understand the challenges brought on by the disorder. AA brings people together who share the same struggles and understand how you feel.
  • Spend time in a judgment-free environment — People with AUD deal with judgment by friends, family, and society. AA offers a judgment-free environment where you can speak openly and honestly about your feelings and experiences without concern.
  • Access to support — Recovery is difficult and requires a lot of support. For many alcoholics, this support is difficult to come by. AA offers a resource for those struggling with alcoholism and gives them access to an organization that provides guidance and support when they need it most.
  • Affordable — It’s free to attend AA meetings, so even those who lack the financial means to enter other recovery programs have access to a sober and supportive environment.

Focuses of AA

Here are some key focuses of AA's principles:

AA and Spirituality

the twelve steps, the twelve traditions of AA announce that God is the ultimate authority. The twelve traditions also state that the organization’s longstanding focus on anonymity has a spiritual purpose too.

the twelve steps, the higher power (or God) mentioned in the twelve traditions is not of a specific religion or belief. Instead, it is simply a spiritual higher power.

AA and Autonomy

The twelve traditions stress that every AA group must be responsible for its governance. An AA group can consist of any two or three alcoholics who want to create one. Groups should communicate and cooperate for the organization's greater good, and its welfare should always be the primary consideration.

wise, AA must stay separate from any political or institutional connections. The twelve traditions also note that AA groups should never go into business. While they can work with hospitals, clinics, and other facilities, they should remain independent.

AA groups must also always be supported by voluntary contributions from members and never charge for their services. This keeps the AA group free from outside influences and protects the anonymity of its members.

AA is Free

AA services are complimentary to anyone who shows a desire to stop drinking. This is regardless of where they are on their recovery journey.

The group and organization must remain focused on the single goal of helping alcoholics and other individuals suffering from addiction without judgment. Because of this, AA should not establish connections or partnerships with any organizations or institutions that could impose rules about providing services.

AA and Anonymity

Anonymity is an essential part of AA’s commitment to helping those struggling with an addiction. It protects the organization's privacy and keeps the focus on its philosophies (instead of its members).

AA members should never give opinions on social or political issues. However, they can do so outside the group in their personal lives.

As anonymity allows AA to put its principles before its personalities, it enables all members to remain humble and serve the organization. For almost a century, AA has grown from small groups of people helping others to a global organization.

Thanks to the principles of the twelve steps and the twelve traditions, AA can stay true to its original goal.

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Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions: The Difference

The twelve steps of AA have become firmly renowned as a path toward recovery from addictions. This includes drug and alcohol addictions, as well as others gambling and sugar addictions. The twelve steps encourage people to acknowledge their problems, seek help, and practice healthier behaviors.

The twelve traditions of AA provide spiritual and practical guidelines for governing the AA organization itself. These traditions foster the practices that enable AA to stay focused on its one objective: to deliver a free, always accessible, and available haven for anyone who wants to break their addictions and build a new, sober life.

The 12 Steps

The 12 Steps are as follows:

  1. Admit powerlessness over alcohol and that your life is unmanageable and you have a drinking problem. This is where the term, “admitting there’s a problem is the first step,” comes from. The first of the 12 steps is admitting you have a problem with alcohol.
  2. Believe in a higher power that can restore you and give you the ability to return to a healthy life. Members of AA acknowledge God or a higher power.
  3. Turn your life over to your higher power.
  4. Conduct a fearless moral inventory of your past and present faults. Members must work to get their affairs in order.
  5. Admit to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs. You must admit your mistakes to another person, in addition to acknowledging them internally and admitting them to your higher power.
  6. Allow your higher power to remove all of your defects of character. Let go and accept that it’s time to change.
  7. Ask your higher power to remove your shortcomings and focus on healing, prayer, meditation, faith, and hope. 
  8. Make a list of all persons you’ve harmed and be willing to make amends. This step involves planning and admitting your wrongs.
  9. Make direct amends to people you’ve harmed unless doing so causes more harm to either party. This step puts step eight into action.
  10. Continue taking personal inventory and promptly admit if and when wrongs occur.
  11. Seek to improve our conscious contact with our higher power, reflect on each day, consider what went wrong, and how you can continue to improve.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of the 12 steps, carry the message to alcoholics and continue to put them into practice.

You don’t have to overcome your addiction alone. Professional guidance and support is available. Begin a life of recovery by reaching out to a specialist today.

Call now (855) 772-9047

What The 12 Steps Mean

The 12 steps provide a framework for recovery. It gives people who want to live a sober life a path to follow.

AA members believe that if they work the 12-step program, it will keep them on track and provide them with the structure needed to remain sober.

The 12 steps also acknowledge the lack of power an individual has over his or her addiction and encourage the reliance on a higher power for help with recovery. 

The 12 steps encourage people to have faith (loving God), surrender, do soul-searching, accept that it’s time to recover, gain humility, and be willing and forgiving. As they move into the later steps, they are encouraged to maintain sobriety and make contact with and carry their message of recovery to other struggling alcoholics. 

The 12 Traditions

The 12 AA Traditions are as follows:

  1. The common welfare of the AA group comes first and the group’s unity supports personal recovery.
  2. God is the ultimate authority for the group and leaders of AA serve but don’t govern.
  3. The only requirement for being a member of AA is a desire to stop drinking.
  4. Groups are autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or the entirety of AA.
  5. Each group has a singular purpose: to carry its message to active alcoholics.
  6. Groups must never endorse, finance, or allow the use of the AA name outside of the group.
  7. Each group must be fully self-supporting and decline outside contributions and should avoid all problems of money.
  8. The organization must remain non-professional. Service centers can employ special workers.
  9. Service boards and committees are allowed to form but are directly responsible to those they serve and there should never be a centralized organization.
  10. AA has no opinion on outside issues and can never be drawn into public controversy.
  11. Outreach is about attraction, not promotion. There is no organized public relations policy.
  12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all of the traditions. Principles are always above personalities.

What The 12 Traditions Mean

The 12 Steps are a cornerstone for recovery. The primary purpose is to give a person a roadmap to recovery. They emphasize how important it is to acknowledge the problem, seek help, and practice healthy behaviors by following the 12 step work.

The 12 Traditions, on the other hand, provide practical and spiritual guidelines for governing the organization. The traditions are used by AA and ensure that the resource is free, available, and a haven to those who need it.

What's Next?

Источник: https://alcoholrehabhelp.org/treatment/alcoholics-anonymous/12-steps-12-traditions/

Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous

Anonymity Is Last in the 12 Traditions of AA

1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity.
2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority – a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
3.

The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.
4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole.
5. Each group has but one primary purpose – to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.
6. An A.

A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the A.A. name to any related facility our outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property, and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.
7. Every A.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
8.

Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever non-professional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
9. A.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or  committees directly responsible to those they serve.
10.

Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.
11. Our public relations policy is attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.
12.

Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

Long Form

Our A.A. experience has taught us that:

One: Each member of Alcoholics Anonymous is but a small part of a great whole. A.A. must continue to live or most of us will surely die. Hence our common welfare comes first. But individual welfare follows close afterward.

Two: For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority – a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience.

Three: Our membership ought to include all who suffer from alcoholism. Hence we may refuse none who wish to recover. Nor ought A.A. membership ever depend upon money or conformity. Any two or three alcoholics gathered together for sobriety may call themselves an A.A. group, provided that, as a group, they have no other affiliation.

Four: With respect to its own affairs, each A.A. group should be responsible to no other authority than its own conscience.

But when its plans concern the welfare of neighboring groups also, those groups ought to be consulted. And no group, regional committee, or individual should ever take any action that might greatly affect A.A.

as a whole without conferring with the trustees of the General Service Board. On such issues our common welfare is paramount.

Five: Each Alcoholics Anonymous group ought to be a spiritual entity having but one primary purpose – that of carrying its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

Six: Problems of money, property, and authority may easily divert us from our primary spiritual aim. We think, therefore, that any considerable property of genuine use to A.A. should be separately incorporated and managed, thus dividing the material from the spiritual. An A.A. group, as such, should never go into business.

Secondary aids to A.A., such as clubs or hospitals which require much property or administration, ought to be incorporated and so set apart that, if necessary, they can be freely discarded by the groups. Hence such facilities ought not to use the A.A. name.

Their management should be the sole responsibility of those people who financially support them. For clubs, A.A. managers are usually preferred. But hospitals, as well as other places of recuperation, ought to be well outside A.A. – and medically supervised. While an A.A.

group may cooperate with anyone, such cooperation ought never to go so far as affiliation or endorsement, actual or implied. An A.A. group can bind itself to no one.

Seven: The A.A. groups themselves ought to be fully self-supported by the voluntary contributions of their own members.

We think that each group should soon achieve this ideal; that any public solicitation of funds using the name of Alcoholics Anonymous is highly dangerous, whether by groups, clubs, hospitals, or other outside agencies; that acceptance of large gifts from any source, or of contributions carrying any obligation whatever, is unwise. Then, too we view with much concern those A.A.

treasuries which continue, beyond prudent reserves, to accumulate funds for no stated A.A. purpose. Experience has often warned us that nothing can so surely destroy our spiritual heritage as futile disputes over property, money, and authority.

Eight: Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever non-professional. We define professionalism as the occupation of counseling alcoholics for fees or hire.

But we may employ alcoholics where they are going to perform those services for which we might otherwise have to engage non-alcoholics. Such special services may be well recompensed. But our usual A.A.

Twelfth Step work is never to be paid for.

Nine: Each A.A. group needs the least possible organization. Rotating leadership is best. The small group may elect its secretary, the large group its rotating committee, and the groups of a large metropolitan area their central or intergroup committee, which often employs a full-time secretary.

The trustees of the General Service Board are, in effect, our A.A. General Service Committee. They are the custodians of our A.A. Traditions and the receivers of voluntary A.A. contributions by which we maintain our A.A. General Service Office at New York.

They are authorized by the groups to handle our overall public relations and they guarantee the integrity of our principal newspaper, the A.A. Grapevine. All such representatives are to be guided by the spirit of service, for true leaders in A.A. are but trusted and experienced servants of the whole.

They derive no real authority from their titles; they do not govern. Universal respect is the key to their usefulness.

Ten: No A.A. group or member should ever, in such a way as to implicate A.A., express any opinion on outside controversial issues – particularly those of politics, alcohol reform, or sectarian religion. The Alcoholics Anonymous groups oppose no one. Concerning such matters they can express no views whatever.

Eleven: Our relations with the general public should be characterized by personal anonymity. We think A.A. ought to avoid sensational advertising. Our names and pictures as A.A.

members ought not be broadcast, filmed, or publicly printed. Our public relations should be guided by the principle of attraction rather than promotion. There is never need to praise ourselves.

We feel it better to let our friends recommend us.

Twelve: And finally, we of Alcoholics Anonymous believe that the principle of anonymity has an immense spiritual significance.

It reminds us that we are to place principles before personalities; that we are actually to practice a genuine humility.

This to the end that our great blessings may never spoil us; that we shall forever live in thankful contemplation of Him who presides over us all.

The Twelve Traditions, in both forms, have been reprinted from Twelve Steps And Twelve Traditions, with permission of A.A. World Services, Inc., and are copyright 1952, 1953, and 1981 by the A.A. Grapevine, Inc., and Alcoholics Anonymous Publishing (now known as Alcohlics Anonymous World Services, Inc.). All rights reserved

Источник: https://www.fortworthaa.org/about-aa/twelve-traditions-of-alcoholics-anonymous/

What The 12 Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous Means And Why Participants Must Follow Them — AA Meeting Locator

Anonymity Is Last in the 12 Traditions of AA

The 12 Traditions of the Alcoholics Anonymous Guide helps the reputed and famous support groups remain focused on their goal.

It first mentioned the 12 Traditions of AA in the first edition of the ‘Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous in 1939.

In 1946, Bill Wilson, co-founder of the group, published ’12 Points to Reassure Our Future’. The book ‘12 Steps and 12 Traditions’ was published in 1953.

Let’s take a closer look at the 12 steps of AA and try to decipher the message behind each one of them.

Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon AA unity.

People may try to kick the addiction on their own, but they are less ly to succeed. Their efforts are more ly to bear fruits if they work with a support group.

Tradition 1 of the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous ensures cohesion and listens to all voices within the group.

While everyone will have their own opinion, all members must accept the majority opinion and work towards achieving that goal.

There is but one ultimate authority for our group purpose – a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.

This Tradition ensures that no single person is asserting any authority over the group. There is no individual governance or management education or subject expertise. The group leaders are there to provide guidance and not to make decisions. 

The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.

Tradition three aims at protecting members from any external influences affecting their resolve to stop drinking. Membership is open to all those who have a relative or a friend with an addiction issue. 

Each group should be autonomous, except in matters affecting other groups or AA as a whole.

This 12 Tradition of AA offers individual groups the freedom to host their meetings their needs and convenience. However, this freedom comes with certain limitations. The group must not move away from the basic tenets and must follow the core principles of the AA.

Each group has but one primary purpose: to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

The primary aim of each group is to make sure that its message reaches those who are suffering. In addition, the group must provide comfort and support to the member at every stage of the journey to recovery. Finally, by sharing the experiences and the hope they found within the 12 steps of AA, they can keep others motivated.

Our groups should never endorse, finance, or lend our name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest money, property, and prestige problems divert us from our primary purpose.

Of the 12 Traditions of AA, tradition six aims to preserve the truthfulness of the program. This is done by preventing groups from supporting or promoting any external agency or organization. Of course, members are not restricted from connecting with any outside agency or party in their capacity. But when they are in a group, they must follow the traditions and ideals of AA.

Every AA group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.

It is entirely voluntary for every member to contribute to the basket to support AA financially. Tradition 7 cautions from accepting outside contributions. Every member must become self-supporting and contribute as per their wish. 

Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever non-professional, but our service centers may employ special workers.

Tradition 8 states that contributions must be used for support services. The group can provide mutual support but remain non-professional. Of course, professionals such as doctors and CAs can be part of the group, but they must not use those affiliations. A newcomer to the group must be welcomed free of charge.  

AA, as such, ought never to be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.

The group works in a non-professional manner without any signs of being organized. There is no hierarchy, and no one is authorized to direct the group. Instead, the group as a whole makes decisions through a process of a conscience vote.

Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the AA name ought never to be drawn into public controversy.

AA members are expected not to express opinions on politics, religion, or reforms to avoid getting caught in any controversy. In addition, AA is not allied with any sect or religion and operates as a neutral body.

Our public relations policy is attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films.

Tradition 11 of the 12 Steps of AA relates to public relations policy and the need to retain anonymity in the media. Members can discuss the benefits of AA, but they should not name the recovery group.

Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles above personalities.

The offer of anonymity to participants is the hallmark of the AA program. So naturally, therefore, it must maintain personal anonymity at all levels.

These 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous help you take care of people at every stage of their recovery journey.

These 12 Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous form the core of all AA meetings. To know where the next AA meeting will be held in your locality, visit our AA Meeting Directory.

Источник: https://www.aa-meetings.com/12-traditions-of-alcoholics-anonymous/

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